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CLO r n 
STAo.\S 



m 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



NMENTI! NATION CENTER 

SAN FRANCISCO PUSLiC LIBRARY 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken Jrom the Library 



C3 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 90186 3630 



72. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



1971 - 1972 




PARKING AUTHORITY 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

MAR 2 6 1980 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



City & County of San Francisco 



PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D 

SERGIO J. SCARPA 

Staff: 
ARTHUR S. BECKER, Director 



HONORABLE JOSEPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



6A1 I8CQ 

PUBLIC U3RARX 

-#- 

ml-2\ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

I. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 1 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTIONS 1 

IV. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction 2 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction . 2-8 

Policy Point No. 3 - Direct Public Financing 

and Construction 8-10 

Summary of Accomplishments to Date 11 

V. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 12-16 

VI. PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 17 

VII. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 17 




Honorable Joseph L. Alioto, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mayor Alioto: 

On behalf of the Members of the Parking Authority and its Staff, I 
submit herewith the report of the San Francisco Parking Authority 
for the fiscal year 1971-1972. 

Culminating almost three year3 of study, the Authority, working with 
the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, has developed a plan for the 
construction of several garages to supplement those now serving the 
"core" area of downtown San Francisco. 



The plan calls for the scattering of some ten structures, containing 
a total of approximately 1,000 parking spaces throughout the downtown 
area, so that the perils of congestion will be avoided. It is 
contemplated that parking meter rates in the downtown area will be 
increased substantially in order to provide a fund to subsidize these 
garages in the event that it becomes necessary to do so. Basic 
financing of the garages should, however, be by means of revenue bond 
sales with the parking meter fund serving merely as an additional 
source of monies if, and only if, needed. 

It is further contemplated that the garages be dedicated to serving 
the short-term, occasional parker and, therefore, it is anticipated 
that parking rates will be structured in a manner that will discourage 
long-term usage. 

During the year, the Board of Supervisors borrowed $1,536,580.11 from 
the Off -Street Parking Fund for the purpose of financing the construction 
of the Howard Street Sewer in the Yerba Buena Center Project. The Fund 
will be reimbursed from the sale of lease revenue bonds or from the sales 
tax account if said bonds are not sold by July 31, 1973» 

While no new Neighborhood Parking Projects were completed during the 
year, preliminary studies were begun on several areas now without parking 
facilities. These include the Haight-Ashbury District, the Outer Irving 
District, and a re-study of the Union Street area. 

During the year, Dr. Michael J. McFadden was re-appointed to a four-year 
term expiring October 26, 1975. Deputy City Attorney Edw. C. A. Johnson 
was appointed Legal Counsel to the Authori^fy^ replacing Mr. Norman Sanford 
Wolff who retired. 




Re*i£ctfully suftSmctted, 



Donald Magnin 
Chairman 





DSEPH L. ALIOTO, mayor 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

450 McAllister street - room 603 
san francisco, california 94102 

(415) 558-3651 



STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal year ending June 30 , 1972 



The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1971-1972, 
together with supplemental information, is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's 
four (4) Quarterly Reports. 



PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, consisting of the Director , 
and two Secretaries . 

PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 
1970-1971 $43,242 

1971-1972 $49,571 

Past ten-year average $43,479 



MEMBERS: 

DONALD MAGNIN 
CHAIRMAN 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 
MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 
ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 
SERGIO J. SCARPA 



ARTHUR S. BECKER 
DIRECTOR 



PARKING AUTHORI TY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County 
government and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making 
recommendations to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters 
pertaining to the off-street parking program. Where required, the 
Authority also acts as an agent for the City and County government 
in carrying out off-street parking programs approved by the City 
administration. 



-2- 



Function No. 1: 



Investigative and recommendatory work 
required for the development of new off- 
street parking facilities throughout 
San Francisco. 



Function No. 2: 



To make recommendation to the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors regarding parking 
rates and charges and the operational 
procedures and regulations in force at 
each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is 
responsible . 



POLICY. PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the 
Authority's policy and program adopted February 8, 1950* 



Policy Point No. I t 



Stimulation of and cooperation with private 
enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 

New parking facilities reported 

completed and placed in operation 

during fiscal year 1971-1972: 822 stalls 



These additions brought the total 
of new off-street parking spaces 
provided under this phase of the 
Authority program since October 6, 
1949, to 



25.792 stalls 



Policy Point No. 2 ; 



Public cooperation with private enterprise 
to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing. 



Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as 
cooperative projects between the City and private business: 



Name 

■xUnion Square 
Garage 

Marshall Square 
Parking Plaza 



Date 
Completed 

September 11, 
1942 

November 1, 
1948 



Stall Construction 

Capacity Land Cost Cost 



Total 
Project 
Cost 



1,081 $ -0- 



$1,646,331 $1,646,331 



111 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



-3- 

Total 
Date Stall Construction Project 

Name Completed Capacity Land Coat Cost Cost 

Civic Center December 18, 276 -0- $ 31,000 Z 31,000 
Auto Park 1953 

St. Mary's Square May 12, 828 $ 417,513 2,300,000 2,717,513 

Garage 19 54 

Forest Hill July 1, 20 -0- -0- -0- 

Parking Plaza 1957 

**Ellis-0'Farrell August 5, 900 -0- -0- 2,800,000 

Garage 1957 

Fifth & Mission August 28, 938 1,690,970 2,966,697 4,657,667 
Garage 1958 

Civic Center March 1, 840 -0- 4,298,822 4,298,822 
Plaza Garage 19 60 

Sutter-Stockton November 19, 870 2,665,069 3,837,177 6,502,246 
Garage i960 



20 


-0- 


900 


-0- 


938 


1,690,970 


840 


-0- 


870 


2,665,069 


534 


-0- 


504 


-0- 


1,000 


1,090,000 


850 


256,640 


316 


258,100 



Fifth & Mission November 21, 534 -0- 1,000,000 1,000,000 
Garage I96I 

Expansion I 

Portsmouth Square August 24, 504 -0- 3,181,500 3,181,500 
Garage 1962 

Golden Gateway December 21, 1,000 1,090,000 6,135,000 7,225,000 
Garage 1966 

Japanese Cultural February 16, 850 256,640 3,750,000 4,006,640 
Center Garages 1968 

Fifth & Mission February 6, 316 258,100 1,188,700 1,446,800 
Garage 1970 

Expansion II 

*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired, and 
effective August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Management 
and Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining assets 
to the City, the Union Square Garage Corporation filed a certificate of winding 
up and dissolution with the Secretary of State. A new operating lease was 
executed between the City and a private garage operator for a period of ten 
years and nine months commencing October 1, 1967- 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it was 
acquired by the City. 



.: 



1 



-4- 

Under Development in this Category 

Sutter-Stocktpn Garage Expansion 

This project is being developed jointly by the City of San Francisco 
Uptown Parking Corporation and the Parking Authority, subject to 
approval by the City. 

A Letter of Intent has been received from the Corporation to finance 
and construct the expansion of the present garage by approximately 
500 additional stalls. This is to be accomplished by using the 
land presently occupied by the City's Department of Social Services 
at the southeast corner of Bush and Stockton Streets and relocating 
this department to more modern offices at 166-170 Otis Street and 
1350 Jessie Street. 

Hearings are being scheduled by the appropriate committees of 
the Board of Supervisors. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial 
facts : 

Location: 585 Bush Street, at the southeast corner of 
Stockton and Bush Streets. 

Size: Approximately 200,000 square feet 

Additional parking stalls: 500 

Total parking stalls: 1,370 

Estimated construction cost: $4,100,000 

Estimated cost of land acquisition: $1,000,000 

Architects; Lackey, Sokoloff , Hamilton & Blewett 

Engineers: H. J. Degenkolb & Associates 

Operator: City of San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation 

Management: System Auto Parks & Garages, Inc. 

Operation: Self -parking 

Parking Rates: Hourly parking 

1 hour 250 

2 hours 550 

3 hours 850 

4 hours $1.20 

5 hours $1.60 

6 hours $2.00 



-5- 



Parking rates: Hourly parking (cont'd) 



7 hours 


$2.40 


8 hours 


$2.80 


9 hours 


$3.20 


10 hours 


$3.30 


24 hours (maximum) 


83-30 



Evening parking 
6:00 PM to 2:30 AM 

Overnight parking 
6:00 PM to 6:00 AM 

Sunday parking 
6:00 AM to 6:00 PM 



850 



$1.10 



550 



Yerba Buena Garages 



First hour 200 

Second hour 400 
Third hour (maximum) 550 

Weekend special 
6:00 PM Saturday to 
6:00 PM Sunday 



$1.65 maxi mum 



Monthly parking $41*25 
(with in and out privileges) 

As existing monthly parking contracts are 
terminated by the present holders, monthly 
parking shall be limited to a maximum of 50 
parking spaces; shall be on a month»to -month 
basis only; and shall be permitted only when 
and if said practice is not to the detriment 
of the transient parker. 



Since formal presentation of this project to the Parking Authority 
by the Redevelopment Agency during last fiscal year, meetings have 
been held by the Yerba Buena Center Public Facilities Advisory Board, 
Preliminary plans for the underground garages and partial exhibit 
hall work have been reviewed by the Bureau of Engineering. The City 
Engineer reports that the circulation plan is satisfactory, but 
requests additional information on the operational characteristics 
when they become available. 

The Parking Authority was requested to approve the use of Off -Street 
Parking Funds in the amount of $1,536,580.11 for relocation of the 
Howard Street sewer to allow construction of the Yerba Buena 
Convention Center to proceed. 



-6- 



Thie action was approved by the Parking Authority June 15 , 1972, 
and subsequently by the Board of Supervisors, with the condition 
that the Off -Street Parking Fund be reimbursed from the sale of 
lease revenue bonds or in any event, from the sales tax account 
of the general fund by July 1, 1973 » said account to be repaid 
from the sale of revenue bonds when the proceeds are available. 

Fiscal Developments in this Category 

Civic Center Plaza Garage 

System Auto Parks & Garages, Inc., professional operator of this 
facility, petitioned the Parking Authority to recommend to the 
Board of Supervisors an adjustment in the rate schedule which 
would permit special event evening parking at a rate of $1.00, 
plus tax, per vehicle, payable at the time of entry, for events 
in the Civic Center area. 

The Parking Authority approved this request, referred legislation 
to the Board of Supervisors, which was adopted to become effective 
May 26, 1972. 

Golden Gateway Garage 

Concurrent with the establishment of a bicycle path between the 
Marina and the Financial District, the City Engineer suggested 
that the Golden Gateway Garage would be a most favorable site 
for bicycle parking and recommended installation of bicycle racks 
in this facility. 

The Parking Authority investigated this suggestion, approved it 
and legislation was adopted by the Board of Supervisors to become 
effective December 29, 1971. 

Japanese Cultural Center Garages 

At the request of the City of San Francisco Western Addition 
Parking Corporation, as Lessee, and National -Braemar, Inc. and 
C & P Service, operators of the Japanese Cultural Center Garages, 
the Parking Authority was petitioned to recommend to the Board of 
Supervisors that rates be adjusted to provide a special all-day 
perimeter parking rate of $1.00 for automobiles parked between 
the hours of 7:00 AM and 9:00 AM and leaving not later than 
7:00 PM the same evening, Monday through Friday only, with no 
in and out privileges. 

The Parking Authority approved this request, legislation was 
adopted by the Board of Supervisors and the new rate became 
effective February 10, 1972. 



-7- 



Marshall Square Parking Plaza 



At the request of Allied Auto Parks, Inc., as Lessee of the 
Marshall Square Parking Plaza, the Parking Authority was 
petitioned to recommend to the Board of Supervisors an 
adjustment of the parking rates to accommodate monthly parkers 
at a rate of $22.50. 

The Parking Authority investigated this request, approved it, 
legislation was adopted by the Board of Supervisors, and the 
new rate became effective March 23, 1972. 

Portsmouth Square Garage 

During the fiscal year, this garage has been modernized and 
renovated for the first time during its ten years of service. 
At the request of the City of San Francisco Portsmouth Plaza 
Parking Corporation, the Parking Authority approved plans and 
specifications for replacement and modernization of two elevators; 
repainting the interior, including new striping of parking lanes; 
moving and replacing the tool shed for the Recreation and Park 
Department; and other necessary renovation of the lighting system. 

San Francisco Municipal Parking Tax 

Legislation reducing the Off -Street Parking Tax from 25% to lOfo 
was approved by the Board of Supervisors to become effective 
July 1, 1972. 

This necessitated revision of the rate schedules at all City- 
controlled parking facilities and adjusting the rates to the 
nearest 50 interval. 

New rate schedules were approved by the Parking Authority and the 
Board of Supervisors and posted at all facilities by the effective 
date. 

The Parking Authority will continue to monitor the effect of the 
reduced parking tax on public and private garage revenues. 

Downtown Short-term Parking Plan 

Under date of April J, 1972, the Downtown Short-term Parking Plan 
was presented to Mayor Joseph Alio to and the Board of Supervisors, 
and was referred to the Joint Finance and Fire, Safety and Police 
Committee on June 19, 1972 by Supervisor Francois for public hearings. 

This plan recommends that several small garages be constructed 
within the "core area" at scattered locations to provide approx- • 
imately 1,000 spaces and the same convenience as on-street parking. 
Rates should be scaled to attract short-term parking and discourage 
long-term parking. 



-8- 



In order to finance this plan, parking meter rates in the downtown 
area should be increased and the revenues placed in the Off -Street 
Parking Fund. Under this plan it is estimated that approximately 
$500,000 in additional revenue could be generated each year to 
finance the new garages. A non-profit corporation should be 
formed for the purpose of constructing and operating the new 
garages. The corporation would issue bonds backed by revenues 
accruing to the Off -Street Parking Fund. The Parking Authority 
will soon hold public hearings to review the proposal. 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by. government and private business under the Parking 
Authority program to date totals 9,568 parking stalls . 

Policy Point No. } i Direct public financing and construction, including 

site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 

The 7»252 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered 
a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking 
program. 

Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

♦Lakeside Village Parking Plazas I and II 49 stalls 

Seventh and Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

*The City originally acquired the sites for the two Lakeside 
Village neighborhood lots located at Ocean Avenue and Junipero 
Serra Boulevard and Ocean and Nineteenth Avenues, constructed 
parking lots thereon and leased them to the Lakeside Village 
Merchants 1 Association for a period of twenty years, commencing 
October 1, 1956. On January 28, 1965, the merchants' association 
requested the City and County of San Francisco to cancel the 
existing lease on the two lots and include them in the Neighbor- 
hood Off-Street Parking Program. In March, 1965, the Lakeside 
Village Parking Plazas I and II were designated as municipal 
off-street parking lots and parking meter regulations were 
established for their operation. 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31, 
1961 for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. The program comprises: 

25 public parking lots, and 

4 public parking garages, in 

17 neighborhood shopping districts, with 

1,102 parking stall total capacity, for 

$5 » 84O, 375 estimated approximate cost 



-9- 



In the Union Street Neighborhood District, property located at 2224-50 Union 
Street was suggested as a possible site for an off-street parking facility 
to serve this area. 

In the City Engineer's analysis of this site, he concluded that there is need 
for short-term parking and that a parking facility at this site would be a 
valuable asset for this business district at a rate comparable with the 
existing street parking meter rate. 

As requested by the Parking Authority, the Real Estate Department proceeded 
with its appraisal of acquisition costs for this parcel of property. This 
appraisal determined that the property has been sold and a building permit 
obtained to renovate and remodel the building. Therefore, further effort 
to acquire the property for use as a parking lot site would not be desirable 
at this time. 

At the request of the Haight-Ashbury Merchants and Improvement Association 
and the Irving Street Merchants Association, the City Engineer has been asked 
to re-survey these neighborhoods to determine the need for off-street parking 
facilities. 

Upon completion of the neighborhood parking program, the number and capacity 
of parking facilities constructed under this category will be: 

Number of facilities 31 

Number of parking stalls 1,616 

Financing Time Schedule 

1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco 
has estimated that the basic program can be financed 
in its entirety from moneys now on deposit in our "Off- 
Street Parking Fund," plus the estimated increments 
which will be realized up to July 1, 1972. These are 
accruing from parking meter revenues at the rate of 
approximately $400,000 a year. 

2. The Neighborhood Parking Program, providing off-street 
parking facilities in these neighborhood districts, is 
as follows: 

Projects approved and in operation : 21 

District 

Eureka Valley ( Castro Street) 
Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 
West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 
West Portal (Claremont-Ulloa Streets) 
Geary ( Geary Boulevard) 
Geary (l8th-19th Avenues) 



Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 i 


I 79,775 


21 


143,858 


20 


155,490 


24 


201,022 


22 


101,155 


56 


164,486 



-10- 



District 

Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 

Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 

Noe Valley (24th Street) 

Portola (Felton Street) 

Mission (l6th and Hoff Streets) 

Mission (24th and Capp Streets) 

Clement (8th Avenue) 

Clement (9th Avenue) 
*Lakeside (junipero Serra and Ocean Avenue) 
^Lakeside (19th and Ocean Avenues) 

North Beach (Vallejo Street) 

Marina (Pierce Street) 

Polk (Redding School) 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 

Bayview (Palou-Mendell Streets) 



Projects re-referred and under study : \ 

Haight-Ashbury (Haight-Cole Streets) 

Polk (Sacramento Street) 

Union (Fillmore-Filbert Streets) 



Parking 
Stalls 


Cost 


36 


% 208,392 


25 


111,017 


16 


53,948 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


19 


91,956 


33 


153,255 


28 


108,441 


) 20) 
21) 


42,035 


163 


967,695 


82 


871,094 


40 


257,000 


30 


131,225 


J£ 


91,828 


759 


$4,240,175 


32 


% 138,600 


56 


243,000 


_5i 


473,600 



141 



% 855,200 



Projects requiring new site 
recommendations, primarily because 
of interim changes in original use ; 

Clement (6th Avenue) 
Outer Irving (23rd Avenue) 
Porto la (San Bruno Avenue) 
Mission (18th and Capp Streets) 
Mission (Capp near 20th Street) 



28 
40 
22 
38 

JUL 



74,500 
213,000 

47,000 
154,000 

256,500 



202 $ 745,000 



1,102 



$5.840.375 



^Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street Parking Program 
March, 1965. 



-11- 



Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarDzed 
as follows: 

Policy Point No« 1 » (Private financing) 

1. Completed 



a. 1971-1972 

b. 1949-1971 

c. Total 



622 stalls 

24, ?70 " 
25,792 " 



11. Total under No. 1 
Policy Point No. 2 : (Public-private financing) 
1. Completed 



a. 1971-1972 

b. 1949-1971 

c. Total 

11. Under development 
a. 1971-1972 



-0- stalls 
9,061 M 

9,061 « 



500 stalls 



111. Total under No. 2 
Policy Point No. 3 : (Public financing) 
1. Completed 



a. 1971-1972 

b. 1949-1971 

c. Total 

11. Under development 
a. 1971-1972 
111. Total under No. 3 
BRAND TOTAL 



-0- stalls 
1,287 " 

1,287 " 



343 stalls 



25,792 stalls 



9,561 stalls 



1,630 stalls 
56.983 stalls 



The actual projected total cost of this program is approximately 
$55 million, of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, 
only about $9 million will have required public financing; roughly only 
about 16$ of the total. 



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-17- 



PRESENT STATUS OF 194| PARKING BOND F UND 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 and issued) $5,000,000.00 

Transferred to Account 232,684.59 

Appropriated $5,252,684.59 

Expended 5.230,438.41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 



Unappropriated balance June 30, 1972 $ 352,560.97 

^Account closed June 30, I960, Surplus funds 
transferred to Unappropriated Account No. 1990. 

Bonds outstanding June 30, 1972 (C Series) $ 130,000.00 
Bonds redeemed 1971-1972 $ 130,000.00 

Bond interest paid 1971-1972 $ 6,500.00 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of Mayor Joseph L. Alio to; the Chief 
Administrative Officer; Members of the Board of Supervisors; the City 
Attorney; Controller; Director of Property; Director of Public Works; 
City Engineer; Traffic Engineer; Director of Planning; the private 
garage industry; the public-spirited citizens comprising the 
corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who have 
given so generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the 
advancement of its program during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
ANC COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



<^2 



Arthur S. Becker 
Director 




ENCS. 






ANNUAL REPORT 



1972-1973 




PARKING AUTHORITY 



City & County of San Francisco 



PARKING AUTHORITY 

DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

JACK DWYER 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D 

SERGIO J. SCARPA * 

Staff: 
ARTHUR S. BECKER, Director 



HONORABLE JOSEPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



'Resigned April 12, 1973 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

I. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 1 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 1 

IV. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction . 2 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction 2-7 

Policy Point No. 3 - Direct Public Financing 

and Construction ....... 7 -10 

Summary of Accomplishments to Date 11 

V. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 12-16 

VI. PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 17 

VII. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 17 

VIII. MAP OF PARKING FACILITIES 




Honorable Joseph L. Alioto, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mayor Alioto: 

On behalf of the Members of the Parking Authority and its Staff, I submit 
herewith the report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal 
year 1972-1973- 

Following herewith are the highlights of the activities of the Authority 
for the current year: 

1. The City of San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation 
delivered the sum of $1 million to the City Controller 
to aid in the financing of the new Social Services 
building so that the present facility will be available 
for expansion of the Sutter-Stockton Garage. 

2. The Authority, with the concurrence of the Director of 
Property, will terminate the Lease of the Mission- 
Bartlett Parking Plaza and will convert that facility 
to a meter-operated lot for inclusion in the 
Neighborhood Off -Street Parking Program. 

3. Since the one lot in the Excelsior District has reached 
saturation usage, it is the intent of the Authority to 
acquire a second lot for that district. 

4. The Authority recommended and the Board of Supervisors 
approved an increase in the downtown parking meter 
rates, and approved the use of $280,000 from the Off- 
Street Parking Fund for 6,000 new meters, provided 
that all additional revenues realized therefrom be 
used for the financing of small downtown garages. 

A non-profit corporation has been formed under the name 
of San Francisco Central City Parking Corporation, and 
a Letter of Intent to aid and assist the City and County 
in acquiring and constructing parking garages in down- 
town San Francisco has been submitted to the Parking 
Authority and Board of Supervisors. The Corporation is 
presently conducting preliminary feasibility studies. 

The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed stringent regulations 
which would seriously affect all off-street parking in San Francisco. It 
requires the reduction of off-street parking in existence as of October 1, 
1973 by 20$ according to the following schedule: 5$ by January 1, 1974 » 
10$ by July 31 t 1974t 15$ by December 21, 1974 and 20$ by April 30, 1975- 
Hearings have been scheduled by the Environmental Protection Agency for 
public testimony. 



Honorable Joseph L. Alioto 
Paje 2 



Since the number of automobiles parked during the current fiscal year 
exceeds those of the prior year by 7«9^» it is apparent that the demand 
for short-term shopper parking continues at a high level. In order to 
protect the economic health of the downtown core area, the maintenance 
of adequate parking facilities for this short-term parker is essential. 
When and if the Environmental Protection Agency promulgates its final 
regulations, it will be necessary for the Authority to restructure both 
its long-term parking and short-term parking policies so as to accommodate 
the maximum number of users. 

Illustrative of my contention that the maintenance of adequate downtown 
perking facilities is absolutely essential is the fact that 75$ of the 
value of 1972-1973 San Francisco construction took place in the downtown 
core area. Suffice it to say, adequate parking must be provided these 
additional facilities and the visitors to them. 

During the year, Mr. Jack Dwyer was appointed to fill the unexpired term 
of Mr, Sergio J. Scarpa, resigned. 




r sutim&tted, 



ctfully 

Donald Magnin & 
Chairman 



3EPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

450 McAllister street - room 603 
san francisco, california 94102 

(415) 558-3651 



STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OP THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal year ending June }Q, 1973 



The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1972-1973. 
together with supplemental information, is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's 
four (4) quarterly Reports. 



PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, consisting of the Director , 
and two Secretaries. 



PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 
1971-1972 $49,571 

1972-1973 #44,985 

Past ten-year average #43,777 



Members: 

DONALD MAGNIN 
Chairman 

JACK DWYER 
FRANCIS H. LOUIE 
MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M. 
ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 



ARTHUR S. BECKER 
Director 



PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County 
government and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making 
recommendations to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters 
pertaining to the off-street parking program. Where required, the 
Authority also acts as an agent for the City and County government 
in carrying out off-street parking programs approved by the City 
administration. 



-2- 



Function No. 1; 



Function No. 2: 



Investigative and recommendatory work 
required for the development of new off- 
street parking facilities throughout 
San Francisco. 

To maKe recommendation to the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors regarding parking 
rates and charges and the operational 
procedures and regulations in force at 
each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is 
responsible. 



POLICY. PROGRAM AND ACCOMPL ISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the 
Authority's policy and program adopted February 8, 1950 • 



Policy Point No. 1 : 



Policy Point No. 2 a 



Stimulation of and cooperation with private 
enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 

New parking facilities reported, 
completed and placed in operation 
during fiscal year 1972-1975: 



These additions brought the total 
of new off-street parking spaces 
provided under this phase of the 
Authority program since October 6, 
1949, to 



542 stalls 



26,554 stalls 



Public cooperation with private enterprise 
to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing. 



Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as 
cooperative projects between the City and private business: 



Name 

*Union Square 
Garage 

Marshall Square 
Parking Plaza 



Completed 

September 11, 
1942 

November 1, 
1948 



Stall 
Capacity Land Cost 



1,081 
111 



-0- 



-0- 



Total 
Construction Project 
Cost Cost 

$1,646,551 $1,646,551 



-0- 



-0- 



-3- 



flame 


Date 
Completed 

December 18, 
1953 


Stall 
Capacity 

276 


Land Cost 
-0- 


Construction 
Cost 


Total 
Project 
Cost 


Civic Center 
Auto Park 


$ 31,000 


* 31,000 


St. Mary's Square 
Garage 


May 12, 
1954 


828 


$ 417,513 


2,300,000 


2,717,513 


Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 


July 1, 
1957 


20 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


Ellis-O'Farrell 
Garage 


August 5» 
1957 


900 


-0- 


-0- 


2,800,000 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 


August 28, 
1958 


938 


1,690,970 


2,966,697 


4,657,667 


Civic Center 
Plaza Garage 


March 1, 
I960 


840 


-0- 


4,298,822 


4,298,822 


Sutter-S to ckton 
Garage 


November 19, 
I960 


870 


2,665,069 


3,837,177 


6,502,246 


Fifth & Mission 

Garage 

Expansion^ 


November 21, 
1961 


534 


-0- 


1,000,000 


1,000,000 


Portsmouth Square 
Garage 


August 24, 
1962 


504 


-0- 


3,181,500 


3,181,500 


Golden Gateway 
Garage 


December 21, 
1966 


1,000 


1,090,000 


6,135,000 


7,225,000 


Japanese Cultural 
Center Garages 


February 16, 
1968 


850 


256,640 


3,750,000 


4,006,64C 


Fifth & Mission 


February 6, 


316 


258,100 


1,188,700 


1, 446 r 80C 



Garage 1970 

Expansion II 

*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired, and 
effective August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Management 
and Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining assets 
to the City, the Union Square Garage Corporation filed a certificate of winding 
up and dissolution with the Secretary of State. A new operating lease was 
executed between the City and a private garage operator for a period of ten 
years and nine months commencing October 1, 1967 • 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it was 
acquired by the City. 



-4- 

Under Development in this Category 

Sutter-Stockton Garage Expansion 

This project is being developed jointly by the City of San Francisco 
Uptown Parking Corporation and the Parking Authority, subject to 
approval by the City. 

A Letter of Intent has been received from the Corporation to 
finance and construct the expansion of the present garage by 
approximately 500 additional stalls. This is to be accomplished 
by using the land presently occupied by the City's Department of 
Social Services at the southeast corner of Bush and Stockton 
Streets and relocating this department to more modern offices at 
166-170 Otis Street and 1350 Jessie Street. 

$1 million has been delivered to the Controller by the Corporation 
to aid in financing the new Social Services building. The 
proposal has been approved by the Board of Supervisors and 
plans for acquisition of the necessary property are going 
forward. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial 
facts: 

Location: 5^5 Bush Street, at the southeast corner of 
Stockton and Bush Streets. 

Size: Approximately 200,000 square feet 

Additional parking stalls: 500 

Total parking stalls: 1,370 

Estimated construction cost: $4 i 100, 000 

Estimated cost of land acquisition: $1,000,000 

Architects: Lackey, Sokoloff, Hamilton & Blewett 

Engineers: H. J. Degenkolb & Associates 

Operator: City of San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation 

Management: System Auto Parks & Garages, Inc. 

Operation: Self -parking 

Parking Rates: Hourly parking 

1 hour 250 

2 hours 550 

3 hours 850 






. 












• 






I 



■ 









: 












• 



' '• . 


• 


- 






■■ 


. 









-5- 



Parking Rates: Hourly parking (cont'd) 



4 hours 


*1.20 


5 hours 


$1.60 


6 hours 


$2.00 


7 hours 


$2.40 


8 hours 


$2.80 


9 hours 


$3.20 


10 hours 


$3.30 


24 hours (maximum) 


$3.30 



Yerba Buena Garages 



Evening parking 850 
6:00 PM to 2:30 AM 

Overnight parking $1.10 
6:00 PM to 6:00 AM 

Sunday parking 550 

6:00 AM to 6:00 PM 

First hour 200 

Second hour 400 

Third hour 550 
(maximum) 



Weekend special 
6:00 PM Saturday to 
6:00 PM Sunday 



$1.65 maximum 



Monthly parking $41.25 
(with in and out privileges) 

As existing monthly parking contracts are 
terminated by the present holders, monthly 
parking shall be limited to a maximum of 50 
parking spaces; shall be on a month-to-month 
basis only; and shall be permitted only when 
and if said practice is not to the detriment 
of the transient parker. 



Since formal presentation of this project to the Parking Authority 
by the Redevelopment Agency, meetings have been held by the Yerba 
Buena Center Public Facilities Advisory Board. Preliminary plans 
for the underground garages and partial exhibit hall work have 
been reviewed. 



The Parking Authority was requested to approve the use of Off -Street 
Parking Funds in the amount of $1,536,580.11 for relocation of the 
Howard Street sewer to allow construction of the Yerba Buena 
Convention Center to proceed. 



-6- 



This action was approved by the Parking Authority June 15, 1972, 
and subsequently by the Board of Supervisors, with the condition 
that the Off -Street Parking Fund be reimbursed from the sale of 
lease revenue bonds or in any event, from the sales tax account 
of the general fund by July 1, 1973 i said account to be repaid 
from the sale of revenue bonds when the proceeds are available. 

While one of the primary law suits was amicably settled this 
past year, other law suits are presently pending in the courts. 

Civic Center Auto Park 

The Lessee of this parking lot, ITT Service Industries Corporation, 
has proposed that certain improvements be made to this facility in 
order to provide more parking stalls and safeguard the public. 
The improvements involve basically repaving the area, striping 
the stalls, and renovating the non-operative flood-lighting 
system, as well as renovation of the entrance ramp. Bids have 
been reviewed by the City Engineer and an arrangement whereby 
the operator will share the cost of improvements is being 
considered. 

San Francisco Municipal Parking Tax 

Legislation reducing the Off -Street Parking Tax from 25% to 10% 
was approved by the Board of Supervisors to become effective 
July 1, 1972. 

This necessitated revision of the rate schedules at all City- 
controlled parking facilities and adjusting the rates to the 
nearest 5# interval. 

New rate schedules were approved by the Parking Authority and 
the Board of Supervisors and posted at all facilities by the 
effective date. 

Revenue figures for 1972-1973 over 1971-1972 show a marked 
improvement : 

1972-1973 $7,757,482.85 

1971-1972 6,905,923.85 

$ 851,559.02 increase, or 12.3% 
Automobiles parked: 

1972-1973 6,100,255 

1971-1972 5,655,850 

446,405 increase, or 7.8% 



. • 



. 









-7- 



Downtown Short-term Parking Plan 

The Authority recommended and the Board of Supervisors approved 
an increase in the downtown parking meter rates, and approved 
the use of $280,000 from the Off -Street Parking Fund for 6,000 
new meters, provided that all additional revenues be used for 
the financing of small downtown garages. 

A non-profit corporation has been formed under the name of San 
Francisco Central City Parking Corporation, and a Letter of 
Intent to aid and assist the City and County in acquiring and 
constructing parking garages in downtown San Francisco has been 
submitted to the Parking Authority and Board of Supervisors. 
The Corporation is presently conducting preliminary feasibility 
studies. 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or 
under development jointly by government and private business under the 
Parking Authority program to date totals 9<568 parking stalls . 

Policy Point No. 5 : Direct public financing and construction, including 

site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 

The 7»252 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered 
a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking 
program. 

Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

*~*Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

*Lakeside Village Parking Plazas I and II 49 stalls 

Seventh and Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

*The City originally acquired the sites for the two Lakeside 
Village neighborhood lots located at Ocean Avenue and Junipero 
Serra Boulevard and Ocean and Nineteenth Avenues, constructed 
parking lots thereon and leased them to the Lakeside Village 
Merchants' Association for a period of twenty years, commencing 
October 1, 1956. On January 28, 1965. the merchants' association 
requested the City and County of San Francisco to cancel the 
existing lease on the two lots and include them in the Neighbor- 
hood Off-Street Parking Program. In March, 1965, the Lakeside 
Village Parking Plazas I and II were designated as municipal 
off-street parking lots and parking meter regulations were 
established for their operation. 

**During this fiscal year, this parking lot has been under review 
by the Parking Authority and Director of Property because of the 















. 



-8- 



continuing delinquency of the present Lessee and the lack of 
any firm indication that this will be corrected under the 
present lease terms. 

Alternate proposals were submitted to the City Engineer for his 
review. Upon his recommendation, the Parking Authority and 
Director of Property have taken action which will terminate 
the present Lease, remodel the facility and convert it to a 
meter-operated lot for the Neighborhood Off -Street Parking 
Program. 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31 > 
1961 for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. The program comprises: 

25 public parking lots, and 

4 public parking garages, in 

17 neighborhood shopping districts, with 

1,102 parking stall total capacity, for 

$5 » 810, 394 estimated approximate cost 

Haight-Ashbury District 

At the request of the Haight-Ashbury Merchants and Improvement 
Association, a re-survey of this area has been conducted. The 
City Engineer recommends stronger enforcement against meter 
violations to the point of eliminating most violators, 
particularly the long-term parker. 

Pacific Heights District 

At the request of the Pacific Heights Merchants and Property 
Owners Association, a re-survey of the area on Fillmore Street 
between California and Jackson Streets has been conducted by 
the City Engineer. He recommends increased enforcement to 
remove parkers who park for periods longer than two hours, 
installation of unmetered areas on the south side of Clay 
Street between Fillmore and Webster Streets, and on the south 
side of Sacramento Street in the portion of the block nearest 
Fillmore Street. 

Excelsior District 

At the request of the Excelsior Businessmens Association for 
a second neighborhood parking facility, the City Engineer has 
conducted a re-survey of this area. He recommends that off- 
street parking facilities be provided in the Norton-Brazil - 
Mission Street area of approximately 20 spaces, as well as in 
the Mission-Persia Street area of approximately 16 spaces. 



-9- 



However, no suitable sites were found, but it is suggested 
that the Excelsior Merchants Association be contacted 
regarding the availability of property. 

Outer Irving District 

At the request of the Irving Street Merchants Association, the 
matter of diagonal parking on Irving Street between 20th and 
27th Streets is being surveyed by the City Engineer. 

Upon completion of the neighborhood parking program, the number and 
capacity of parking facilities constructed under this category will be: 

Number of facilities 31 

Number of parking stalls 1,616 

Financing Time Schedule 

1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco 
has estimated that the basic program can be financed 
in its entirety from moneys now on deposit in our "Off- 
Street Parking Fund," plus the estimated increments 
which will be realized up to July 1, 1972. These are 
accruing from parking meter revenues at the rate of 
approximately $400,000 a year. 

2. The Neighborhood Parking Program, providing off-street 
parking facilities in these neighborhood districts, is 
as follows: 

Projects approved and in operation : 21 

District 

Eureka Valley ( Castro Street) 
Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 
West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 
West Portal (Claremont-Ulloa Streets) 
Geary (Geary Boulevard) 
Geary (l8th-19th Avenues) 
Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 
Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 
Hoe Valley (24th Street) 
Porto la (Felton Street) 
Mission (16 th and Hoff Streets) 
Mission (24th and Capp Streets) 
Clement (8th Avenue) 
Clement (9th Avenue) 



Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 


$ 79,773 


21 


143,838 


20 


135,490 


24 


192,650 


22 


101,133 


36 


164,486 


36 


208,392 


25 


111,017 


16 


53,948 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


19 


88,862 


33 


153,255 


28 


108,441 



. •■ ■ 



-10- 



District 

♦Lakeside ( Junipero Serra and Ocean Avenue) 
♦Lakeside (l9th and Ocean Avenues) 

North Beach (Vallejo Street) 

Marina (Pierce Street) 

Polk (Redding School) 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 

Bay View (Palou-Mendell Streets) 



Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


) 20) 
21) 


$ 42,035 


163 


967,695 


82 


855,622 


40 


257,000 


30 


131,225 


Jl 


88.785 



759 



,210,194 



Projects re-referred and under study ; £ 

Haight-Ashbury (Haight-Cole Streets 

Polk (Sacramento Street) 

Union (Fillmore -Filbert Streets) 



32 
56 

141 



$ 138,600 
243,000 

473,600 
$ 855,200 



Projects requiring new site 
recommendations, primarily because 
of interim changes in original use ; 

Clement (6th Avenue) 
Outer Irving (23rd Avenue) 
Portola (San Bruno Avenue) 
Mission (18th and Capp Streets) 
Mission (Capp near 20th Street) 



28 


$ 74,500 


40 


213,000 


22 


47,000 


38 


154,000 


J± 


256,500 



202 



1,102 



S 745,000 
tt5.810.594 



♦Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street Parking 
Program March, 1965. 












• 
























: 



-11- 



Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may "be summarized 
as follows: 

Policy Point No, 1 : (Private financing) 

1. Completed 



a. 1972-1973 

b. 1949-1972 

c. Total 



542 stalls 
25,792 » 
26,334 " 



11. Total under No. 1 
Policy Point No. 2 : (Public-private financing) 
1. Completed 



a. 1972-1973 

b. 1949-1972 

c. Total 



-0- stalls 
9,061 » 
9,061 » 



11. Under development 

a. 1972-1973 500 stalls 
111. Total under No. 2 
Policy Point No. 3 ? (Public financing) 
1. Completed 



a. 1972-1973 

b. 1949-1972 

c. Total 

11. Under development 
a. 1972-1973 
111. Total under No. 3 
GRAND TOTAL 



-0- stalls 
1,287 n 
1,287 " 



343 stalls 



26,334 stalls 



9,561 stalls 



1,630 stalls 
>25 stalls 



The actual projected total cost of this program is approximately 
S55 million, of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, 
only about $9 million will have required public financing; roughly only 
about ±6% of the total. 



- 



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-17- 



PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 



Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 and issued) $5,000,000.00 

Transferred to Account 232,684.59 

Appropriated $5,232,684.59 

Expended 5.230,438.41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 



Unappropriated balance June 30, 1973 $ 368,156.88 

^Account closed June 30, I960, Surplus funds 
transferred to Unappropriated Account No. 1990* 

Bonds outstanding June 30, 1973 (C Series) $ -0- 
Bonds redeemed 1972-1973 $ 130,000.00 

Bond interest paid 1972-1973 $ 3,250.00 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of Mayor Joseph L. Alioto; the Chief 
Administrative Officer; Members of the Board of Supervisors; the City 
Attorney; Controller; Director of Property; Director of Public Works; 
City Engineer; Traffic Engineer, Director of Planning; the private 
garage industry; the public-spirited citizens comprising the 
corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who have 
given so generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the 
advancement of its program during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



( ' < C f^t** 



Arthur S. Becker 
Director 




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ANNUAL REPORT 



1973-1974 



LM 




PARKING AUTHORITY 



City & County of San Francisco 



PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

JACK DWYER 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 



Staff: 
ARTHUR S. BECKER, Director 



HONORABLE JOSEPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

I. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 1 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 1 

IV. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction 2 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction 2-7 

Policy Point No. 3 - Direct Public Financing 

and Construction 7-10 

Summary of Accomplishments to Date 11 

V. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 12-16 

VI. PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING FOND FUND 17 

VII. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 17 

VIII. MAP OF PARKING FACILITIES 




Honorable Joseph L. Alio to, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco, California 94102 

Pear Mayor Alio to: 

On behalf of the Parking Authority and its Staff, 1 submit herewith 
the report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal year 
1975-1974. 

Following are the highlights of the activities of the Authority and a 
resume of other actions affecting its operation: 

1. The maximum parking period was increased from one hour 
to two hours at the Portola Parking Plaza and at Vest 
Portal Parking Plazas 1 and 11. 

2. Re-surveys, to determine the current level of demand, 
were made (or are contemplated) for the Excelsior 
Parking Plaza and the Noriega Parking Plaza. 

3. The transition from private operation to City operation 
was made at the Mission-Bartiett Parking Plaza when, on 
June 14, 1974 » the installation of 228 parking meters 
was completed. 

4* All of the 6,000 250 parking meters have been installed 
in the core area of San Francisco. The San Francisco 
Central City Parking Corporation is actively engaged in 
reviewing properties suitable for small garages to be 
located in the downtown area. It is contemplated that 
these garages will be financed from the excess revenues 
generated by the 250 meter rate. 

5* Parking meter collections increased by approximately 
$557 i 000 over the prior fiscal year to a total of 
$2,055tOOO. This sum approximates that projected by 
the Authority as resulting from the increase in core 
area rates and approximates that amount needed to finance 
the proposed garages. 

6. Upon recommendation of the Authority, the Board of 
Supervisors approved the use of off-street parking 
revenues for the construction of on-street parking 
bays in the neighborhood shopping districts. 

During the year, Members Francis Louie and Achille Muschi were re- 
appointed to four year terms. 

>ectfully submitted, 

Donald Magnin w 
Chairman 





EPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

450 McAllister street - room 603 
san francisco. california 94102 

(415) 558-3651 



STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OP THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal year ending June 30. 1974 



The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1973-1974 > 
together with supplemental information, is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's 
four (4) quarterly Reports. 



PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for f our-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, including the Director. 



PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 
1972-1973 $49,620 

1973-1974 $52,518 

Past ten-year average $45,284 



Members: 

DONALD MAGNIN 
Chairman 

JACK DWYER 
FRANCIS H. LOUIE 
MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D 
ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 



ARTHUR S. BECKER 
Director 



PARKING AUTH ORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County 
government and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making 
recommendations to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters 
pertaining to the off-street parking program. Where required, the 
Authority also acts as an agent for the City and County government 
in carrying out off-street parking programs approved by the City 
administration. 



-2- 



Function No. 1: 



Investigative and recommendatory work 
required for the development of new off- 
street parking facilities throughout 
San Francisco. 



Function No. 2: 



To make recommendation to the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors regarding parking 
rates and charges and the operational 
procedures and regulations in force at 
each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is 
responsible. 



POLICY. PROGRAM AND ACCOMP LISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the 
Authority's policy and program adopted February 8, 1950. 

Policy Point No. 1 ; Stimulation of and cooperation with private 

enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 



New parking facilities reported, 
completed and placed in operation 
during fiscal year 1973-1974: 

These additions brought the total 
of new off-street parking spaces 
provided under this phase of the 
Authority program since October 6, 
1949, to 



1,492 stalls 



27,826 stalls 



Policy Point No. 2 ; Public cooperation with private enterprise 

to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing. 

Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 



Name 

*Union Square 
Garage 

Marshall Square 
Parking Plaza 



Completed 

September 11, 
1942 

November 1, 
1948 



Stall 
Capacity 



Land Cost 



Construction 
Cost 



Total 
Project 
Cost 



1,081 $ -0- 



$1,646,331 $1,646,331 



111 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



-3- 

Total 
Stall Construction Project 

Name Completed Capacity Land Coat Cost Cost 

Civic Center December 18, 276 -0- $ 31,000 $ 31,000 
Auto Park 1953 

St. Mary's Square May 12, 828 $ 417,513 2,300,000 2,717,513 

Garage 1954 

Forest Hill July 1, 20 -0- -0- -0- 

Parking Plaza, 1957 

**Ellis-0'Farrell August 5, 900 -0- -0- 2,800,000 
Garage 1957 

Fifth & Mission August 28, 938 1,690,970 2,966,697 4,657,667 
Garage 1958 

Civic Center March 1, 840 -0- 4,298,822 4,298,822 
Plaza Garage 19 60 

Sutter-Stockton November 19, 870 2,665,069 3,837,177 6,502,246 
Garage i960 

Fifth & Mission November 21, 534 -0- 1,000,000 1,000,000 
Garage I96I 

Expansion I 

Portsmouth Square August 24, 504 -0- 3,181,500 3,181,500 
Garage 1962 

Golden Gateway December 21, 1,000 1,090,000 6,135,000 7,225,000 
Garage 1966 

Japanese Cultural February 16, 850 256,640 3,750,000 4,006,640 
Center Garages 1968 

Fifth & Mission February 6, 316 258,100 1,188,700 1,446,800 
Garage 1970 

Expansion II 

*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired, and 
effective August 31, 19 61, it assigned all of its interest in the Management 
and Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining assets 
to the City, the Union Square Garage Corporation filed a certificate of winding 
up and dissolution with the Secretary of State. A new operating lease was 
executed between the City and a private garage operator for a period of ten 
years and nine months commencing October 1, 1967 . 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it was 
acquired by the City. 



-4- 

Under Development in this Category 

Sutter-Stockton Garage Expansion 

This project is being developed jointly by the City of San Francisco 
Uptown Parking Corporation and the Parking Authority, subject to 
approval by the City. 

A Letter of Intent has been received from the Corporation to 
finance and construct the expansion of the present garage by 
approximately 500 additional stalls. This is to be accomplished 
by using the land presently occupied by the City*s Department of 
Social Services at the southeast corner of Bush and Stockton 
Streets and relocating this department to more modern offices 
at 166-170 Otis Street and 1350 Jessie Street. 

$1 million has been delivered to the Controller by the Corporation 
to aid in financing the new Social Services building. The 
proposal has been approved by the Board of Supervisors and 
plans for acquisition of the necessary property are going 
forward. 

Latest information indicates that the Corporation will be required 
to obtain an Environmental Protection Agency permit for construction 
of this expansion unless it can be commenced before January 1, 1975* 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial 
facts : 

Location: 585 Bush Street, at the southeast corner of 
Stockton and Bush Streets. 

Size: Approximately 200,000 square feet 

Additional parking stalls: 500 

Total parking stalls: 1,370 

Estimated construction cost: $4 » 100, 000 

Estimated cost of land acquisition: $1,000,000 

Architects: Lackey, Sokoloff , Hamilton & Blewett 

Engineers: H. J. Degenkolb & Associates 

Operator: City of San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation 

Management: System Auto Parks & Garages, Inc. 

Operation: Self -parking 



-5- 



Parking Rates: Hourly parking (tax i: 


deluded) 


1 hour 


250 


2 hours 


550 


3 hours 


850 


4 hours 


$1.20 


5 hours 


SI. 60 


6 hours 


$2.00 


7 hours 


$2.40 


8 hours 


$2.80 


9 hours 


$3.20 


10 hours 


$3.30 


24 hours (maximum) 


$3.30 


Evening parking 


850 


6:00 PM to 2:30 AM 





Overnight parking $1.10 
6:00 PM to 6:00 AM 



Sunday parking 
6:00 AM to 6:00 


PM 


550 


First hour 




200 


Second hour 




400 


Third hour 




550 


(maximum) 






Weekend special 




$1.65 maximum 



6:00 PM Saturday to 
6:00 PM Sunday 

Monthly parking $41.25 
(with in and out privileges) 

As existing monthly parking contracts are 
terminated by the present holders, monthly 
parking shall be limited to a maximum of 50 
parking spaces; shall be on a month-to-month 
basis only; and shall be permitted only when 
and if said practice is not to the detriment 
of the transient parker. 



Yerba Buena Garages 



Bicycle parking 



250 flat rate 
(24-hour maximum) 



Since formal presentation of this project to the Parking Authority 
by the Redevelopment Agency, meetings have been held by the Yerba 
Buena Center Public Facilities Advisory Board. Preliminary plans 
for the underground garages and partial exhibit hall work have 
been reviewed. 



-6- 



The Parking Authority was requested to approve the use of Off- 
Street Parking Funds in the amount of $1,536,560.11 for relocation 
of the Howard Street sewer to allow construction of the Yerba Buena 
Convention Center to proceed. 

This action was approved by the Parking Authority June 15, 1972, 
and subsequently by the Board of Supervisors, with the condition 
that the Of f -Street Parking Fund be reimbursed from the sale of 
lease revenue bonds or in any event, from the sales tax account 
of the general fund by July 1, 1973 » said account to be repaid 
from the sale of revenue bonds when the proceeds are available. 

While one of the primary law suits was amicably settled this past 
year, other law suits are presently pending in the courts. At 
this time the remaining two law suits were settled and details 
are awaiting approval by the Board of Supervisors. 

Performing Arts Center 

The City of San Francisco Performing Arts Center Corporation has 
presented a Letter of Intent to aid and assist the City and County 
of San Francisco in acquisition and construction of a parking 
facility in the Performing Arts Center Project. This Letter of 
Intent and Feasibility Report were referred to the City Controller, 
Director of Property, Department of Public Works and Department of 
City Planning for review and recommendation. 

Bicycle parking in public garages 

During the fiscal year, bicycle parking has been approved by the 
Parking Authority and Board of Supervisors for the Union Square, 
Sutter-Stockton, Fifth and Mission and Ellis-O'Farrell Garages. 
The rate is a 250 flat rate (24-hour maximum) and is the same 
as charged at the Civic Center and Golden Gateway Garages. This 
is in conformity with Board of Supervisors' Resolution No. 363-71* 
approved June 30, 1971* urging the Parking Authority to provide 
bicycle parking in City-owned garages. 

Civic Center Auto Park 

The Lessee of this parking lot, ITT Service Industries Corporation, 
has proposed that certain improvements be made to this facility in 
order to provide more parking stalls and safeguard the public. The 
improvements involve basically repaving the area, striping the 
stalls, and renovating the non-operative flood-lighting system, 
as well as renovation of the entrance ramp. An arrangement 
whereby the operator will share the cost of improvements has 
been agreed upon. Plans and specifications have been approved. 
Bids have been received and are being reviewed by the City Engineer. 

San Francisco Municipal Parking Tax 

Legislation reducing the Off -Street Parking Tax from 25% to IQfo 
was approved by the Board of Supervisors to become effective 
July 1, 1972. 



-7- 



This necessitated revision of the rate schedules at all City- 
controlled parking facilities and adjusting the rates to the 
nearest 50 interval. 

New rate schedules were approved by the Parking Authority and 
the Board of Supervisors and posted at all facilities by the 
effective date. 

Revenue figures for 1973-1974 over 1972-1973 show a small 
improvement : 



1973-1974 $7,919,100.86 

1972-1973 7,757.462.85 

$ 161,618.01 increase, or 2.0$ 
Automobiles parked; 

1973-1974 6,037,888 

1972-1973 6,100,255 

62,367 decrease, or -1.0$ 
Downtown Short-term Parking Plan 

Following approval by the Board of Supervisors of an increase 
in the downtown parking meter rates and approval of the use of 
$280,000 from the Off -Street Parking Fund, 6,000 250 parking 
meters have been installed in the downtown core area of San 
Francisco. 

The non-profit corporation formed under the name of San Francisco 
Central City Parking Corporation is actively engaged in reviewing 
properties for small garages in the downtown core area to be 
financed from revenue derived from this increased parking meter 
rate. 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or 
under development jointly by government and private business under the 
Parking Authority program to date totals 9,568 parking stalls . 

Policy Point Mo. ? ; Direct public financing and construction, including 

site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 

The 7,252 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered 
a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking 
program. 



■w* 



-8- 



Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

**Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

♦Lakeside Village Parking Plazas I and II 49 stalls 

Seventh and Harrison parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

*The City originally acquired the sites for the two Lakeside 
Village neighborhood lots located at Ocean Avenue and Junipero 
Serra Boulevard and Ocean and Nineteenth Avenues, constructed 
parking lots thereon and leased them to the Lakeside Village 
Merchants 1 Association for a period of twenty years, commencing 
October 1, 1956. On January 28, 1965 » the merchants' association 
requested the City and County of San Francisco to cancel the 
existing lease on the two lots and include them in the Neighbor- 
hood Off -Street Parking Program. In March, 1965 t the Lakeside 
Village Parking Plazas I and II were designated as municipal 
off-street parking lots and parking meter regulations were 
established for their operation. 

**During this fiscal year, conversion of this parking facility 
and its inclusion into the Neighborhood Parking Program has 
been completed and the facility officially opened June 14, 
1974 • It is now a parking meter operation with 128 2-hour 
meters and 100 8-hour meters. 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31, 
1961 for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City is a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. The program comprises: 

20 public parking lots, and 
2 public parking garages, in 
15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 
987 parking stall total capacity, for 
$4 1 763 » 269 estimated approximate cost 

Portola District 

As recommended by the Bureau of Engineering and approved by the 
Portola District Merchants Association, the maximum parking period 
in the Portola Parking Plaza was increased from one hour to two hours, 

Noe Valley District 

As recommended by the City Engineer in a re-survey of the Noe Valley 
Shopping District to determine if there has been a change in parking 
patterns and if any parking shortages exist, parking meters were 
installed on the side streets off of 24th Street which would balance 
the parking shortage. 



-9- 

West Portal District 

As requested by the West Portal Avenue Association and approved 
by the Bureau of Engineering, the maximum parking period in the 
West Portal Parking Plazas I and II was increased from one hour 
to two hours. 

Excelsior District 

The Excelsior Businessmen's Association requested a survey of double 
or triple decking the Excelsior Parking Plaza. The City Engineer's 
report indicates that this would not be feasible because of excessive 
costs for the benefits gained. 

Noriega District 

At the request of the Noriega Merchants Association, the City Engineer 
has been requested to re-survey this neighborhood. However, he advises 
that parking surveys taken during the summer months do not reflect the 
true demand for parking since vacations and other factors distort the 
true demand. Therefore, he recommends that the survey not be done 
until September. 

Mission-Bartlett Parking plaza 

Conversion of this parking lot and its inclusion into the Neighborhood 
Off-Street Parking Program has been completed and was officially 
opened June 14, 1974* It is now a parking meter operation with 128 
2-hour meters and 100 8-hour meters. 

Vallejo Street Garage 

The hourly and monthly rates were increased at this garage, becoming 
effective the latter part of June. The hourly rate of 100 for the 
first hour is being maintained for the benefit of the merchants' 
association. 

Use of Off-Street Parking Fund 

The Parking Authority recommended and the Board of Supervisors approved 
an Ordinance amending Part II, Chapter XI, San Francisco Municipal Code 
(Traffic Code) by amending Section 213 thereof, extending the use of 
the Off -Street Parking Fund to include construction of on-street 
parking bays in parking meter districts in neighborhood shopping 
districts. Plans are proceeding to implement this process in the 
Outer Irving District. 



11. : •;' 



-10- 



Financing Time Schedule 



1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco 
has estimated that the basic program can be financed 
in its entirety from moneys now on deposit in our "Off- 
Street Parking Fund, n plus the estimated increments 
which will be realized up to July 1, 1974* 

2. The Neighborhood Off -Street Parking Program, providing 
off-street parking facilities in these neighborhood 
districts, is as follows: 



Projects approved and in operation : 22 

District 

Eureka Valley ( Castro Street) 

Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 

West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 

West Portal (Claremont-Ulloa Streets) 

Geary (Geary Boulevard) 

Geary (l8th-19th Avenues) 

Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 

Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 

Noe Valley (24th Street) 

Portola (Felton Street) 

Mission (16 th and Hoff Streets) 

Mission (24th and Capp Streets) 
**Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 

Clement (8th Avenue) 

Clement (9th Avenue; 
*Lakeside (junipero Serra and Ocean Avenue) 
*Lakeside (19 th and Ocean Avenues) 

North Beach (Vallejo Street) 

Marina (pierce Street) 

Polk (Redding School) 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 

Bay View (Palou-Mendell) 



Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 


$ 79,768 


21 


143,838 


20 


135,490 


24 


192,650 


22 


101,133 


36 


164,486 


36 


208,391 


25 


111,018 


16 


53,947 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


19 


88,862 


228 


645,800 


33 


153,254 


28 


108,440 


20) 
21) 


42,025 


163 


874,645 


82 


855,622 


40 


257,351 


30 


131,217 


.15 


88,785 



28J 



S4.763.269 



■^Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street Parking 
Program March, 1965. 



**Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street Parking 
Program June, 1974* 



-11- 



Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized 
as follows: 

Policy Point No* 1 ; (Private financing) 

1. Complete 



1,492 stalls 
26 ,33* » 



a. 1973-1974 

b. 1949-1973 

c. Total 27,82( 

11. Total under No. 1 
Policy Point No. 2 : (Public-private financing) 
1. Completed 



a. 1973-1974 
t>. 1949-1973 
c. Total 



-0- stalls 
9,061 " 
9 061 ■ 



11. Under development 

a. 1973-1974 500 stalls 

111. Total under No. 2 
Policy Point No. 3 : (Public financing) 
1 . Completed 



a. 1973-1974 

b. 1949-1973 

c. Total 

11. Under development 
a. 1973-1974 
111. Total under No. 3 
GRAND TOTAL 



-0- stalls 
1,287 » 
1,287 



343 stalls 



27,826 stalls 



9,561 stalls 



1,630 stalls 
39.017 stalls 



The actual projected total cost of this program is approximately 
$55 million, of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, 
only about $9 million will have required public financing; roughly only 
about 16% of the total. 







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-17- 



PRESENT STATUS OF 1?47 PARKING BOND FUND 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 and issued) $5,000,000.00 

Transferred to Account 252,684.59 

Appropriated $5,232,684.59 

Expended 5.232,438.41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 



Unappropriated balance June 30, 1974 $ 342,577*14 

♦Account closed June 30» I960, Surplus funds 
transferred to Unappropriated Account No. 1990 • 



All outstanding bonds have matured, have been presented for 
payment and will no longer constitute an obligation of the 
City. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of Mayor Joseph L. Alioto; the Chief 
Administrative Officer; Members of the Board of Supervisors; the City 
Attorney; Controller; Director of Property; Director of Public Works; 
City Engineer; Traffic Engineer; Director of Planning; the private 
garage industry; the public-spirited citizens comprising the 
corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who have 
given so generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the 
advancement of its program during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



^C^ZtZ*^ S, yD^cA^^^ 



Arthur S. Becker 
Director 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



1974-75 




MilSS 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

JACK DWYER 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 



Staff: 
ARTHUR S. BECKER, Director 



HONORABLE JOSEPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

I. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 1 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 1 

IV. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction 2 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction 2-8 

Policy Point No. 3 - Direct Public Financing 

and Construction 9-H 

Summary of Accomplishments to Date 12 

V. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 13-17 

VI. PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 18 

VII. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 18 

VIII. MAP OF PARKING FACILITIES 




Honorable Joseph L. Alioto, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mayor Alioto: 

On behalf of the Parking Authority and its Staff, I submit herewith 
the report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal year 
1974-1975. 

The activities and accomplishments of the Authority are briefly 
summarized in the following paragraphs: 

1. As a result of the appropriation of $27,000 from the Off- 
Street parking Fund, the City Engineer will soon begin a 
study that will up-date our information concerning the need, 
if any, for additional parking facilities in the various 
neighborhood shopping districts. 

2. Sidewalk narrowing, to permit angle parking on certain 
streets in the Irving Street shopping district, will be 
commenced as a result of the appropriation of $62,000 
from the Off -Street Parking Fund. 

3. The Social Services Department vacated its premises at 585 
Bush Street, and the expansion of the Sutter-Stockton Garage 
at that site is well under way. 

4» A Letter of Intent, dated September 25, 1974 from the San 
Francisco Central city parking Corporation, offering to 
aid and assist the City and County of San Francisco in the 
acquisition, construction and financing of a parking facility 
at the southeast corner of Mission and Steuart Streets was 
presented to the Authority at its Regular Meeting October 24, 
1974* A revised Letter of Intent dated February 24, 1975 was 
submitted to the Board of Supervisors by the San Francisco 
Central City parking Corporation and referred to the parking 
Authority March 3 S 197^. 

Legislation approving the Joint Working Agreement between the 
City and County of San Francisco and the parking Authority 
for use of off-street parking funds for preparation of an 
Environmental Impact Report is presently before the parking 
Authority for consideration. 

5* Rate increases for several of the City -owned garages are under 
consideration. These revisions will (a) provide additional 
funds to cover operating cost increases resulting from higher 
wage and utility costs, and (b) will keep rates more nearly in 
line with those of the private sector, since it is not the policy 
of the Authority to sustain so low a rate structure that the 
private operator is penalized unfairly. Further, rate increases 
for other City-owned facilities have been effected. 



-2- 

6. parking meter revenues for the fiscal year were approximately 
$2,422,000, an increase of $366,000 over the prior fiscal year, 
and an increase of $923,000 over the fiscal year 1972-1973. 

For a more detailed analysis of the operating results of the various 
facilities, and for additional information on the status of the City 
parking program, 1 refer you to the report Itself . 




Respectfully subaltlfed, 

Donald Magnin / 
Chairman ff 




JOSEPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

450 McAllister street - room 603 
san francisco. california 94102 

(415) 558-3651 



STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal year ending June 30, 1975 
***#***•***•*****■*****#**■*•** 



The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1974-1975, 
together with supplemental information, is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's 
four (4) quarterly Reports. 



PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, including the Director. 



PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 
1973-1974 $52,518 

1974-1975 $57,029 

Past ten-year average $46,565 



Members: 

DONALD MAGNIN 
Chairman 

JACK DWYER 
FRANCIS H. LOUIE 
MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.C 
ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 



ARTHUR S. BECKER 
Director 



PARKING AUTHORIT Y FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County 
government and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors of the city and County of San Francisco. 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making 
recommendations to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters 
pertaining to the off-street parking program. Where required, the 
Authority also acts as an agent for the City and County government 
in carrying out off-street parking programs approved by the City 
administration. 



-2- 



Punction No. 1: 



Function No, 2: 



Investigative and recommendatory work 
required for the development of new off- 
street parking facilities throughout 
San Francisco. 

To make recommendation to the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors regarding parking 
rates and charges and the operational 
procedures and regulations in force at 
each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is 
responsible . 



POLICY. PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the 
Authority's policy and program adopted February 8, 1950. 

Policy Point No. I t Stimulation of and cooperation with private 

enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 



New parking facilities reported, 
completed and placed in operation 
during fiscal year 1974-1975 

These additions brought the total 
of new off-street parking spaces 
provided under this phase of the 
Authority program since October 6, 
1949, to 

Policy Point No. 2 t Public cooperation with private enterprise 

to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing. 



1,940 stalls 



29,766 stalls. 



Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 



Name 

♦Union Square 
Garage 

Marshall Square 
Parking plaza 



Completed 

September 11, 
1942 

November 1, 
1948 



Stall 
Capacity 



Land Cost 



1,081 $ -0- 



111 



-0- 



Construction 
Cost 



Total 
Project 
Cost 



$1,646,331 $1,646,331 



-0- 



-0- 



-3- 

Total 
Stall Construction Project 

Name Completed Capacity Land Cost Cost Cost 

$ 31,000 $ 31,000 

2,300,000 2,717,513 
-0- -0- 

-0- 2,800,000 

2,966,697 4,657,667 

4,298,822 4,298,822 

3,837,177 6,502,246 

1,000,000 1,000,000 

3,181,500 3,181,500 

6,135,000 7,225,000 

3,750,000 4,006,640 

1,188,700 1,446,800 



*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired and 
effective August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Management 
and Occupancy Agreement to the City* After transferring its remaining assets 
to the City, the Union Square Garage Corporation filed a certificate of winding 
up and dissolution with the Secretary of State. A new operating lease was 
executed between the City and a private garage operator for a period of ten 
years and nine months commencing October 1, 1967 . 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it was 
acquired by the City. 



Civic Center 
Auto Park 


December 18, 
1953 


276 


-0- 


St. Mary's Square 
Garage 


May 12, 
1954 


828 


$ 417,513 


Forest Hill 
Parking plaza 


July 1, 
1957 


20 


-0- 


**Ellis-0 » Farrell 
Garage 


August 5, 
1957 


900 


-0- 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 


August 28, 
1958 


938 


1,690,970 


Civic Center 
Plaza Garage 


March 1, 
I960 


840 


-0- 


Sutter-Stockton 
Garage 


November 19, 
I960 


870 


2,665,069 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 
Expansion I 


November 21, 
1961 


534 


-0- 


Portsmouth Square 
Garage 


August 24, 
1962 


504 


-0- 


Golden Gateway 
Garage 


December 21, 
1966 


1,000 


1,090,000 


Japanese Cultural 
Center Garages 


February 16, 
1968 


850 


256,640 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 
Expansion II 


February 6, 
1970 


316 


258,100 



-4- 

Under Development in this Category 

Sutter-Stockton Garage Expansion 

This project has been developed jointly by the City of San 
Francisco Uptown parking Corporation and the parking Authority 
and approved by the City. 

A Letter of Intent received from the Corporation proposed to 
finance and construct the expansion of the present garage by 
approximately 500 additional stalls. This is being accomplished 
by using the land formerly occupied by the City's Department of 
Social Services at the southeast corner of Bush and Stockton 
Streets and relocating this department to more modern offices 
at 166-170 Otis Street and 1350 Jessie Street. 

Social Services vacated the premises at 585 Bush Street, thereby 
permitting demolition and construction to commence December 27, 
1974 • The construction contract calls for completion in 48O 
calendar days from that date - approximately 16 months - with 
completion expected by April JO, 1976. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial 
facts : 

Location: 585 Bush street, at the southeast corner of 
Stockton and Bush Streets 

Size; Approximately 200,000 square feet 

Additional parking stalls: 500 

Total parking stalls: 1,370 

Estimated construction cost: $4 * 100, 000 

Estimated cost of land acquisition: $1,000,000 

Architects: Lackey, Sokoloff, Hamilton & Blewett 

Engineers: H. J. Degenkolb & Associates 

Operator: City of San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation 

Management: System Auto Parks & Garages, Inc. 

Operation: Self -parking 



-5- 



Parking Ra 


tes: Hourly parking (tax 


: included) 




1 hour 


250 




2 hours 


550 




3 hours 


850 




4 hours 


$1.20 




5 hours 


SI. 60 




6 hours 


$2.00 




7 hours 


$2.40 




8 hours 


$2.80 




9 hours 


$3.20 




10 hours 


$3.30 




24 hours (maximum) 


$3.30 




Evening parking 


850 




6:00 PM to 2:30 AM 






Overnight parking 


$1.10 . 




6:00 PM to 6:00 AM 






Sunday parking 


550 




6:00 AM to 6:00 PM 






First hour 


200 




Second hour 


400 




Third hour 


550 




(maximum) 






Weekend special 


$1.65 maximum 



Yerba Buena Garages 



6:00 PM Saturday to 
6:00 PM Sunday 

Monthly parking $41*25 
(with in and out privileges) 

As existing monthly parking contracts are 
terminated by the present holders, monthly 
parking shall be limited to a maximum of 50 
parking spaces; shall be on a month-to-month 
basis only; and shall be permitted only when 
and if said practice is not to the detriment 
of the transient parker. 

Bicycle parking 250 flat rate 

(24 -hour maximum) 



Since formal presentation of this project to the Parking Authority 
by the Redevelopment Agency, meetings have been held by the Yerba 
Buena Center Public Facilities Advisory Board. Preliminary plans 
for the underground garages and partial exhibit hall work have 
been reviewed. 



-6- 



The Parking Authority was requested to approve the use of Off- 
Street Parking Funds in the amount of $1,536,580.11 for relocation 
of the Howard Street sewer to allow construction of the Yerba Buena 
Convention center to proceed. 

This action was approved by the Parking Authority June 15, 1972, 
and subsequently by the Board of Supervisors, with the condition 
that the Off -Street parking Fund be reimbursed from the sale of 
lease revenue bonds or in any event, from the sales tax account 
of the general fund by July 1, 1973 1 said account to be repaid 
from the sale of revenue bonds when the proceeds are available. 

While one of the primary law suits was amicably settled this 
past year, other law suits are presently pending in the courts. 



Performing Arts center 

Sponsors of San Francisco Performing Arts Center, Inc. have 
presented a Letter of Intent to aid and assist the City and 
County of San Francisco in acquisition and construction of a 
parking facility in the Performing Arts center Project. This 
Letter of Intent and Feasibility Report were referred to the 
City Controller, Director of Property, Department of Public 
Works and Department of City Planning for review and recommendation. 

Present plans call for a change of site from Marshall Square to the 
Civic Center Auto Park (Commerce High School playfield). The 
proposal as planned will contain a 400-stall parking garage on a 
section of the proposed site. In order to obtain approval by the 
City for the Commerce High School site, an Eavironmental Impact 
Report has been prepared by the staff of the City Planning Department, 
paid for fey Sponsors, as a final step in the designation of this site 
as a suitable location. 

Bicycle parking in public garages 

During the fiscal year, bicycle parking has been approved by the 
Parking Authority and Board of Supervisors for the Fifth and Mission 
and Ellis -O'Farrell Garages. The rate is a 250 flat rate (24 -hour 
maximum) and is the same as charged at Civic Center, Golden Gateway, 
Union Square and Sutter-Stockton Garages. This is in conformity 
with Board of Supervisors' Resolution No. 363 _ 71» approved June 30 » 
1971 » urging the Parking Authority to provide bicycle parking in 
City-owned garages. 

Civic Center Auto Park 

The Lessee of this parking lot, ITT Service Industries Corporation, 
proposed that certain improvements be made to this facility in order 
to provide more parking stalls and safeguard the public. The 
improvements involved repaving the area, striping the stalls, and 
renovating the non-operative flood-lighting system, as well as 
renovation of the entrance ramp. 



-7- 



An arrangement whereby the operator would share the coat of 
improvements was agreed upon. The renovation began December 6, 
1974 and was completed December 23, 1974 • 



Golden Gateway Garage 



Savoy Auto parks & Garages, Inc. was approved operator of this 
garage for a two-year term becoming effective July 1, 1974* 



Fifth & Mission Garage 



S. E. Onorato Incorporated was approved operator of this garage 
for a three-year term becoming effective July $1, 1974* 

Ellis-Q'Farrell Garage 

Savoy Auto parks & Garages Inc. was approved operator of this 
garage for a five-year term beginning May 1, 1975* 

Japanese Cultural center Garages 

National -Braemar, Inc. was approved direct operator of these 
garages for an additional three-year term beginning March 1, 
1975. 

Civic Center Plaza Garage 

Extension of the City Lease between the City of San Francisco 
Civic Plaza parking Corporation and the City and County of San 
Francisco was approved by the Parking Authority, the Recreation 
and park Department and the Board of Supervisors for an additional 
five years at the same annual rental of $285,000. 

Operation of this facility was awarded to Larry Barrett Garages 
by the City of San Francisco Civic Plaza parking Corporation for 
a term of five years beginning March 1, 1975* 

Parking Rate Increases 

Hourly and monthly rate increases were approved by the Parking 
Authority and the Board of Supervisors for the Civic Center 
Auto Park, Civic Center Plaza Garage and Marshall Square parking 
Plaza. Hourly rates were increased 50 V ei hour for the first two 
hours in the three facilities; three to six hours increased on a 
sliding scale from 100 to 600 at the garage and 100 to 500 for the 
two lots; the monthly rate at the garage increased by $7»00 and 
$8.00 at the two lots. 

San Francisco Municipal parking Tax 

Legislation reducing the Off -Street Parking Tax from 25% to 10f 
was approved by the Board of supex-vdeors to become effective 
July 1, 1972. 



-8- 



This necessitated revision of the rate schedules at all City- 
controlled parking facilities and adjusting the rates to the 
nearest 50 interval. 

New rate schedules were approved by the parking Authority and 
the Board of Supervisors and posted at all facilities by the 
effective date. 

Revenue figures for 1974-1975 over 1973-1974 show an improvement: 

1974-1975 $8,428,783.60 

1973-1974 7,919,100.86 

$ 509,682.74 increase, or +6.4% 

Automobiles parked: 

1974-1975 6,100,806 

1973-1974 6,037,888 

62,918 increase, or +1.0$ 

Downtown Short-term Parking Plan 

Following approval by the Board of Supervisors of an increase 
in the downtown parking meter rates and approval of the use of 
$280,000 from the Off -Street Parking Fund, 6,000 250 parking 
meters have been installed in the downtown core area of San 
Francisco. 

A non-profit corporation formed under the name of San Francisco 
Central City Parking Corporation has submitted a Letter of Intent 
to the Board of Supervisors and parking Authority to aid and 
assist the City and County of San Francisco in the acquisition, 
construction and financing of a parking facility at the southeast 
corner of Mission and Steuart Streets under the name of Embarcadero 
Garage, with a capacity of 475 stalls. 

Legislation approving the Joint Working Agreement between the City 
and County of san Francisco and the parking Authority for use of 
off-street parking funds for preparation of an Environmental Impact 
Report was approved by the parking Authority and will be forwarded 
to the Board of Supervisors for consideration. 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or 
under development jointly by government and private business under the 
Parking Authority program to date totals 9,568 parking stalls . 



-9- 



Policy Point Ho. 3 ; Direct public financing and construction, including 

site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 

The 7»252 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered 
a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking 
program. 

Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

**Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

^Lakeside Village Parking plazas I and n 49 stalls 

Seventh and Harrison Parking plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

*The City originally acquired the sites for the two Lakeside 
Village neighborhood lots located at Ocean Avenue and Junipero 
Serra Boulevard and Ocean and Nineteenth Avenues, constructed 
parking lots thereon and leased them to the Lakeside Village 
Merchants 1 Association for a period of twenty years, commencing 
October 1, 1956. On January 28, 1965, the merchants' association 
requested the City and County of San Francisco to cancel the 
existing lease on the two lots and include them in the Neighbor- 
hood Off -Street Parking program. In March, 1965, the Lakeside 
Village Parking plazas I and II were designated as municipal 
off-street parking lots and parking meter regulations were 
established for their operation. 

**During the fiscal year 1973-74* conversion of this parking 

facility and its inclusion into the Neighborhood parking Program 
was completed and the facility officially opened June 14, 1974* 
It is now a parking meter operation with 128 2-hour meters and 
100 8-hour meters. 

Neighborhood Shopping District parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31, 
1961 for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City is a major 
addition to pa rk i n g facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. The program comprises: 

20 public parking lots, and 

2 public parking garages, in 
15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 
987 parking stall capacity, for 
$4 » 763 f 269 estimated approximate cost 

Clement District 

At the request of the Clement Street Merchants Association, the 
City Engineer made a re-survey of this neighborhood area in 
September, 1974« This survey shows that an additional 33 spaces 



-10- 



can be gained on the side streets by installation of parking 
meters to the depth of the commercial frontage. This will 
more than balance the shortage. This matter is awaiting 
public hearing by the Board of Supervisors. 



Taraval-Parkside District 



The Taraval-parkside merchants expressed a need for off-street 
parking on Taraval Street between 32nd and }$r& Avenues. In a 
survey made in January, the City Engineer recommended that 45 
additional spaces could be gained by placing time limit 
restrictions on the side streets to the depth of the commercial 
frontage property and on Taraval Street between 33^d and 34th 
Avenues. This recommendation is awaiting a decision by the 
merchants . 



Excelsior District 



In response to a request from the Excelsior Merchants Association, 
the Department of City Planning issued an unfavorable report on 
the proposal of the local merchants for a municipal parking lot 
at the corner of Francis and Merchant Streets. Meetings are 
continuing with the merchants' association and representatives 
of other City Departments to provide additional off-street 
parking in the area. 

Noriega District 

At the request of the Noriega Merchants Association, the City 
Engineer is in the process of issuing his re-survey of this 
neighborhood shopping district. 

Use of Off-Street Parking Fund 

The parking Authority recommended and the Board of Supervisors 
approved an Ordinance amending part II, Chapter XI, San Francisco 
Municipal Code (Traffic Code) by amending Section 213 thereof, 
extending the use of the Off -Street Parking Fund to include 
construction of on-street parking bays in parking meter districts 
in neighborhood shopping districts. Funds in the amount of 
$62,000 from the Off-Street Parking Fund have been approved 
to implement this process in the Outer Irving District. 

Funds in the amount of $27,000 from the Off-Street Parking Fund 
have been approved for a city-wide parking study by the City 
Engineer to re-evaluate the present municipal parking lots and 
the need for additional off-street parking facilities in 
Neighborhood Shopping Districts. 

Funds in the amount of $35,500 from the Off-Street Parking Fund 
were approved for purchase of spare meters to be used by the 
Department of Electricity for preventive maintenance, vandalism, 
vehicle damage to meters and theft. 



-11- 



Financing Time Schedule 



1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco 
has estimated that the basic program can be financed 
in its entirety from moneys now on deposit in our "Off - 
Street Parking Fund, » plus the estimated increments 
which will be realized up to July 1, 1975. 

2. The Neighborhood Off -Street Parking Program, providing 
off-street parking facilities in these neighborhood 
districts, is as follows: 



Projects approved and in operation ; 22 

District 

Eureka Valley ( Castro Street) 

Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 

West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 

West Portal ( Claremont-Ulloa Streets) 

Geary ( Geary Boulevard) 

Geary (18th-19th Avenues) 

Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 

Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 

Noe Valley (24th Street) 

Portola fFelton Street) 

Mission (16th and Hoff Streets) 

Mission (24th and Capp Streets) 
*-*Mission-Bartlett Parking plaza 

Clement (8th Avenue) 

Clement (9th ivenue) 
♦Lakeside (junipero Serra and Ocean Avenue) 
♦Lakeside (19th and Ocean Avenues) 

North Beach (vallejo Street) 

Marina (pierce Street) 

Polk (Redding School) 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 

Bay View (Palou-Mendell) 



Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 


$ 79,768 


21 


143,838 


20 


135,490 


24 


192,650 


22 


101,133 


36 


164,486 


36 


208,391 


25 


111,018 


16 


53,947 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


19 


88,862 


228 


645,800 


33 


153,254 


28 


108,440 


20) 
21) 


42,025 


163 


874,645 


82 


855,622 


40 


257,351 


30 


131,217 


J£ 


88,785 


2H 


S4. 763, 269 



♦Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street Parking 
program March, 19 65. 



♦♦Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street Parking 
Program June, 1974* 



-12- 



Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized 
as follows: 

Policy Point No. 1 : (Private financing) 

1 . Completed 



a. 1974-1975 

b. 1949-1974 

c. Total 



1,940 stalls 
27,826 » 
29,766 » 



11. Total under No. 1 
Policy Point No. 2 ; (public-private financing) 
1. Completed 



29,766 stalls 



a. 1974-1975 

b. 1949-1974 

c. Total 



-0- stalls 
9,061 " 
9,061 » 



11. Under development 

a. 1974-1975 500 stalls 

111. Total under No. 2 
Policy Point No. 3 » (Public financing) 
1 . Completed 



a. 1974-1975 

b. 1949-1974 

c. Total 

11. under development 
a. 1974-1975 
111, Total under No. 3 
GRAND TOTAL 



-0- stalls 
1,287 " 
1,287 " 



343 stalls 



9,561 stalls 



1,630 stalls 
40,957 stalls 



The actual projected total cost of this program is approximately $55 million, 
of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, only about $9 
million will have required public financing; roughly only about 16$ of the 
total. 



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-18- 



PRESEM' STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOM) FUImB 



Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 and issued) $5,000,000.00 

Transferred to Account 252,684.59 

Appropriated $5,252,684.59 

Expended 5.250,458.41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 



Unappropriated balance June 50, 1975 $ 555,626.92 



^Account closed June JQ, I960, Surplus funds 
transferred to Unappropriated Account JNo. 1990. 



All outstanding bonds have matured, have been presented for 
payment and will no longer constitute an obligation of the 
City. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

•a-********* 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of Mayor Joseph L. Alioto, the Chief 
Administrative Officer, Members of the Board of Supervisors, the City 
Attorney, Controller, Birector of Property, Birector of Public Works, 
City Engineer, Traffic Engineer, Birector of Planning, the private 
garage industry, the public-spirited citizens comprising the 
corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who have 
given so generously of their time and contributed so greatly to 
the advancement of its program during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF TBE CITY 
ANB COUNTY OF SAW FRAlMCISCO 



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Arthur S. Becker 
Birector 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



1975 — 1976 




DOCUMENT5 DEPT. 

MAR 2 6 1980 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

JACK DWYER 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M. D. 



Staff: 
ARTHUR S. BECKER, Director 



HONORABLE GEORGE R. MOSCONE, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE AND DEDICATION OF ANNUAL REPORT 

I. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 1 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 1 

IV. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction 2 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction ....... 2-7 

Policy Point No. 3 - Direct Public Financing 

and Construction 7-9 

Summary of Accomplishments to date 10 

V. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 11-13 

VI. PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 14 

VII. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 14 

VIII. MAP OF PARKING FACILITIES 




Honorable George R. Moscone, Mayor 
City and Covin ty of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mayor Moscone: 

On behalf of the Parking Authority and its Staff, I submit herewith 
the report of tne San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal 
year 1975-1976. 

The activities and accomplishments of the Authority are briefly 
summarized in the following paragraphs: 

1. Funds in the amount of $27,000 were appropriated from the 
Off -Street Parking Fund for the City Engineer to conduct a 
parking study to re-evaluate the present municipal parking 
lots and the need for additional off-street parking facilities 
in Neighborhood Shopping Districts. Report No. 1 of this study- 
was presented to the Parking Authority at its Regular Meeting 
of July 9> 1976. It contains the results of parking surveys 
conducted during the fall of 1975* Report No. 2 will cover 
detailed recommendations for neighborhood shopping districts 
having substantial parking shortages, and should be completed 
in two or three months. 

2. Sidewalk narrowing to provide angle parking on certain avenues 
off of Irving Street has been completed in this neighborhood 
shopping area. Funds in the amount of $62,000 were approved 
from the Off -Street Parking Fund to provide for this project. 
This procedure has proven successful in this neighborhood and 
is being considered for use in other neighborhood areas. 

3. Demolition and construction for expansion of the Sutter-Stockton 
Garage commenced in December, 1974* The City of San Francisco 
Uptown Parking Corporation reports that the major construction 
is completed and that the additional 500 parking stalls are in 
full use. 

4. Funds in the amount of $20,000 from the Off -Street Parking 
Fund were approved for a revenue study and preliminary plans, 
soils investigation and report necessary for preparation of 

a draft Environmental Impact Report and Environmental Impact 
Report to determine the feasibility of a public off-street 
parking facility at or near The Embarcadero and Mission and 
Steuart Streets. This report is expected within the near 
future . 

5. Present plans call for construction of the Performing Arts Center 
on the Civic Center Auto Park site (Commerce Playfield), with the 
proposed garage to be located on Franklin Street bounded by Grove 
and McAllister Streets. 



-2- 



6. Parking meter collections for the fiscal year 1975-1976 were 
$2,319,760, a decrease of $106,870, as compared to the fiscal 
year 1974-1975* This was due mainly as a consequence of the 
City craft workers' strike which lasted 28 working days during 
March and April, 1976, plus extensive jamming and vandalism of 
the meters which commenced during this period. 

7. In September, 1975 the Parking Authority declared $1,000,000 of 
the Off-Street Parking Fund to he surplus and transferred that 
sum to the General Fund for traffic regulation and control. 

Again in May, 1976, $1,500,000 was declared surplus for transfer 
to the General Fund to be used for tne reduction of the Ad Valorem 
tax rate. 

Legislation was approved in June, 1976 amending the Traffic Code 
to provide that parking meter funds in excess of $1,500,000 shall 
be credited to the Off -Street Parking Fund, providing that moneys 
in the funa may be used for payment of administrative expenses of 
the Parking Authority thereby eliminating the necessity for 
allocation of funds from Ad Valorem taxes, for certain possessory 
interest taxes and for pledge of past and future indebtedness 
incurred by the issuance of bonds by or on behalf of the City 
and County for acquisition, construction and completion of off- 
street parking facilities. 

For a more detailed analysis of the operating results of the various 
facilities and for additional information on the status of the City's 
parking program, I refer you to the report itself. 



Respectfully su 

Donald Magnin 
Chairman 




Members of the Parking Authority 
take pleasure in dedicating this 
Annual Report to Arthur S. Becker 
upon his fortncoming retirement 
effective January 31 » 1977* 




Mr. Becker began his association with the Parking Authority in 
1961 when he was appointed a Member by Mayor George Christopher. 

He served as Chairman during the years 19&4 anc ^ 1965* 

In 19o6, upon the retirement 01 tne former Director, Mr. BecKer 
assumed that position and will occupy it until his forthcoming 
retirement. 

To adequately describe his contributions to the Authority, to the 
City and to the advancement of the parking program is impossible. 

Suffice it to say, without his expertise, persistence and patience, 
the accomplishments of the Authority as outlined in the accompanying 
report would not have been possible. 

On a personal note, I have had the privilege of having served with 
him as an Authority Member and as his close associate during his 
tenure as Director. My job as Chairman would have been an 
impossible one were it not for his dedicated assistance and advice. 
The Neighborhood Parking Program, for example, was developed during 
his association with the Authority, and I know from my close connection 
with it, that it would not have assumed its present form without the 
constant supervision of Mr. Becker. 

On behalf of all the Members of the Parking Authority, we wish 
Mr. Becker and his family continued good health and happiness - 
we wish Arthur success and pleasure in whatever endeavor he sees 
fit to undertake in the future. 



Most of all, we will miss him greatly! 



Donald Magnin, Chairman 

Jack Dwyer, Member 

Francis H. Louie, Member 

Michael J. McPadden, M. D. , Member 

Achille H. Muschi, Member 




ORGE R. MOSCONE, Mayor 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

450 McAllister street - room 603 
san francisco. california 94102 

(415) 558-3651 



STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OP THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal year ending June 30, 1976 



The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1975-1976, 
together with supplemental information, is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's 
four (4) Quarterly Reports. 



PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, including the Director. 

PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 
1974-1975 $57,029 

1975-1976 $60,310 

Past ten-year average $47,832 



Members: 

DONALD MAGNIN 
Chairman 

Jack Dwyer 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 
MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 
ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 



ARTHUR S. BECKER 
Director 



PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County 
government and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making 
recommendations to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters 
pertaining to the off-street parking program. Where required, the 
Authority also acts as an agent for the City and County government 
in carrying out off-street parking programs approved by the City 
administration. 



-2- 



Function Mo. It 



Investigative and recommendatory work 
required for the development of new off- 
street parking facilities throughout 
San Francisco. 



Function No. 2: 



To make recommendations to the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors regarding parking 
rates and charges and the operational 
procedures and regulations in force at 
each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is 
responsible. 



POLICY. PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the 
Authority's policy and program adopted February 8, 1950. 



Policy Point No. 1 : 



Policy Point No. 2 : 



Stimulation of and cooperation with private 
enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 

New parking facilities reported, 

completed and placed in operation 

during fiscal year 1975-1976 381 stalls 



These additions brought the total 
of new off-street parking spaces 
provided under this phase of the 
Authority program since October 6, 
1949, to 



30,147 stalls 



Public cooperation with private enterprise 
to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing. 



Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 



Name 

*TJnion Square 
Garage 

Marshall Square 
Parking Plaza 



Completed 

September 11, 
1942 

November 1, 
1948 



Stall 
Capacity Land Cost 

1,081 $ -0- 



111 



-0- 



Construction 
Cost 



Total 
Project 
Cost 



$1,646,331 $1,646,331 



-0- 



-0- 



-3- 

Total 
Stall Construction Project 

Name Completed Capacity Land Cost Cost Cost 



Civic Center 
Auto Park 


December 18, 
1953 


276 


-0- 


$ 31,000 


$ 31,000 


St. Mary's Square 
Garage 


May 12, 1954 


828 


S 417,513 


2,300,000 


2,717,513 


Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 


July 1, 
1957 


20 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


♦Ellis-O'Farrell 
Garage 


August 5, 
1957 


900 


-0- 


-0- 


2,800,000 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 


August 28, 
1958 


938 


1,690,970 


2,966,697 


4,657,667 


Expansion I 


November 21, 
1961 


534 


-0- 


1,000,000 


1,000,000 


Expansion II 


February 6, 
1970 


316 


258,100 


1,188,700 


1,446,800 


Sutter-Stockton 
Garage 


November 19, 
I960 


870 


2,665,069 


3,837,177 


6,502,246 


Expansion I 


July, 1976 


500 


1,000,000 


4,100,000 


5,100,000 


Portsmouth Square 
Garage 


August 24, 
1962 


504 


-0- 


3,181,500 


3,181,500 


Golden Gateway 
Garage 


December 21, 
1966 


1,000 


1,090,000 


6,135,000 


7,225,000 


Japanese Cultural 


February 16, 


850 


256,640 


3,750,000 


4,006,64c 



Center Garages 1968 

*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired and, 
effective August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Management 
and Occupancy Agreement to the City, After trans fe-cxdng its remaining assets 
to the City, the Union Square Garage Corpox-ation filed a certificate of winding 
up and dissolution with the Secretary of State. A new operating lease was 
executed between the City and a private garage operator for a period of ten 
years and nine months commencing October 1, 1967* 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it was 
acquired by the City. 

Sutter-Stockton Garage Expansion I 

This project was developed jointly by the City of San Francisco 
Uptown Parking Corporation and the Parking Authority and approved 
by the City. 



-4- 



The Corporation financed and constructed the expansion of the 
present garage by 500 additional stalls. This was accomplished 
by using the land, formerly occupied by the City's Department of 
Social Services at the southeast corner of Bush and Stockton 
Streets and relocating this department to more modern offices 
at 166-170 Otis Street and 1350 Jessie Street, 

Social Services vacated the premises at 585 Bush Street, thereby 
permitting demolition and construction to commence December 27, 
1974- This expansion was fully operative July 1, 1976 except 
for installation of certain operative devices, painting, 
decorating and placement of directional signs. 

Present physical and financial facts are: 

Location: 585 Bush Street at the southeast corner of 
Stockton and Bush Streets 

Size: Approximately 200,000 square feet 

Additional parking stalls: 500 

Total parking stalls: 1,370 

Estimated construction cost: $4,100,000 

Estimated cost of land acquisition: $1,000,000 

Architects: Lacky, Sokoloff , Hamilton & Blewett 

Engineers: H. J. Degenkolb & Associates 

Operator: City of San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation 

Management: System Auto Parks & Garages, Inc. 

Operation: Self -parking 

Parking Rates: Hourly parking (tax included) 



1 hour 






300 


2 hours 






600 


3 hours 






900 


4 hours 






$1.30 


5 hours 






$1.70 


6 hours 






$2.15 


7 hours 






$2.60 


8 hours 






$3.00 


9 hours 






$3.50 


>4 hours 


(maximum) 


$3.50 


Overnight parking 


$1.00 


6:00 PM 


to 


6:00 AM 





-5- 

Sunday parking 

6:00 AM to 6:00 EM 

First hour JO0 

Second hour 600 

Third hour 900 
(maximum) 

Weekend special $1,90 maximum 
6:00 PM Saturday to 
6:00 PM Sunday 

Monthly parking $50.00 
(with in and out privileges) 

As existing monthly parking contracts are 
terminated by the present holders, monthly 
parking shall be limited to a max i mum of 50 
parking spaces; shall be on a month-to-month 
basis only; and shall be permitted only when 
and if said practice is not to the detriment 
of the transient parker. 

Bicycle parking 250 flat rate 

(24-hour maximum) 



Yerba Buena Garages 



Since formal presentation of this project to the Parking Authority 
by the Redevelopment Agency, meetings have been held by the Yerba 
Buena Center Public Facilities Advisory Board. Plans for the 
garages have been held in abeyance due to law suits presently 
pending in the courts. 

The Parking Authority was requested to approve the use of Off- 
Street Parking Funds in the amount of $1,536,580.11 for relocation 
of the Howard Street sewer to allow construction of the Yerba Buena 
Convention Center to proceed. 

This action was approved by the Parking Authority June 15, 1972, 
and subsequently by the Board of Supervisors, with the condition 
that the Off -Street Parking Fund be reimbursed from the sale of 
lease revenue bonds or in any event, from the sales tax account 
of the general fund by July 1, 1973, said account to be repaid 
from the sale of revenue bonds when the proceeds are available. 

Subsequently, Mayor Moscone has appointed a citizens' committee 
charged with the responsibility of holding public hearings and 
making recommendations to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors. 



-6- 



Perfonm ng Arts Center 



Sponsors of San Francisco Performing Arts Center, Inc. presented 
a Letter of Intent to aid and assist the City and County of San 
Francisco in acquisition and construction of a parking facility 
in the Performing Arts Center Project. This Letter of Intent and 
Feasibility Report were referred to the City Controller, Director 
of Property, Department of Public Works and Department of City 
Planning for review and recommendation. 

Present plans call for the Performing Arts Center to be constructed 
on the Civic Center Auto Park site (Commerce High School Playfield), 

The proposal calls for a multi -level, self -standing garage to be 
relocated on Franklin Street bounded by Grove, Gough and 
McAllister Streets. 



Parking Rate Increases 

Hourly and monthly rate increases were approved by the Parking 
Authority and Board of Supervisors for the Ellis-O'Farrell, 
Golden Gateway, Sutter-Stockton and Union Square Garages. 

Rate increases have been requested by the non-profit corporations 
for the Fifth and Mission and Portsmouth Square Garages and are 
under review by the City Engineer, Director of Property and 
Controller for recommendation. 

San Francisco Municipal Parking Tax 

Legislation reducing the Off -Street Parking Tax from 25% to 10% 
was approved by the Board of Supervisors to become effective 
July 1, 1972. 

Revenue figures since that time have shown a constant increase: 

1975-1976 $9,372,259-44 

1974-1975 $8,428,783.60 

1973-1974 $7,919,100.86 
Automobiles parked: 

1975-1976 6,286,071 

1974-1975 6,100,806 

1973-1974 6,037,888 
Downtown Short-term Parking plan 

Following approval by the Board of Supervisors of an increase 
in the downtown parking meter rates and approval of the use of 



-7- 

$280,000 from the Off -Street Parking Fund, 6,000 250 parking 
meters were installed in the downtown core area of San Francisco. 

A non-profit corporation formed under the name of San Francisco 
Central City Parking Corporation has submitted a Letter of Intent 
to the Board, of Supervisors and Parking Authority to aid and 
assist the City and County of San Francisco in the acquisition, 
construction and financing of a parking facility at the southeast 
corner of Mission and Steuart Streets under the name of Embarcadero 
Garage, with a capacity of 475 stalls. 

Legislation approving the Joint Working Agreement between the City 
and County of San Francisco and the Parking Authority for use of 
off-street parking funds for an Environmental Impact Report was 
approved by the Parking Authority and the Board of Supervisors 
and is in the process of review by the Department of City Planning. 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or 
under development jointly by government and private business under the 
Parking Authority program to date totals 9»568 parking stalls . 

Policy Point No. 3 ; Direct public financing and construction, including 

site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 

The 7 i 252 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered 
a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking 
program. 

Constructed in this Category 

**Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

^Lakeside Village Parking Plazas I and II 49 stalls 

Seventh and Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

*The City originally acquired the sites for the two Lakeside 
Village neighborhood lots located at Ocean Avenue and Junipero 
Serra Boulevard and Ocean and Nineteenth Avenues, constructed 
parking lots thereon and leased them to the Lakeside Village 
Merchants' Association for a period of twenty years, commencing 
October 1, 1956. On Jsm.ifi.xy 28, 1965, the merchants' association 
requested the City and Comity of San Francisco to cancel the 
existing lease on the two lots and include them in the Neighbor- 
hood Off -Street Parking Program. In March, 1965, the Lakeside 
Village Parking Plazas I and II were designated as municipal 
off-street parking lots and parking meter regulations were 
established for their operation. 

■^During the fiscal year 1973-1974 » conversion of this parking 
facility and its inclusion into the Neighborhood Parking Program 
was completed and the facility officially opened June 14, 1974. 
It is now a parking meter operation with 128 2-hour meters and 
100 8-hour meters. 



-8- 



Meighborhood Shopping Distinct Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31, 
1961 for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City is a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. The program comprises: 

20 public parking lots, and 

2 public parking garages, in 
15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 
987 parking stall capacity, for 
$4,763,269 estimated approximate cost 

Use of Off-Street Parking Fund 

The Parking Authority recommended and the Board of Supervisors 
approved an Ordinance amending Part II, Chapter XI, San Francisco 
Municipal Code (Traffic Code) by amending Section 213 thereof, 
extending the use of the Off -Street Parking Fund to include 
construction of on-street parking bays in parking meter districts 
in neighborhood shopping districts. Funds in the amount of #62,000 
from the Off -Street Parking Fund were approved to implement this 
process in the Outer Irving District and the project has been 
completed. This procedure is being considered in other neighborhood 
areas where feasible. 

Funds in the amount of $27,000 from the Off -Street Parking Fund 
were approved for a City -wide parking study by the City Engineer 
to re-evaluate the present municipal parking lots and the need 
for additional off-street parking facilities in Neighborhood 
Shopping Districts. Report No. 1 containing results of parking 
surveys conducted during the Fall of 1975 has been received. 
Report No. 2 containing detailed recommendations for neighborhood 
shopping districts having substantial parking shortages should be 
received in the near future. 

In September, 1975 the Parking Authority declared $1,000,000 surplus 
in the Off -Street Parking Fund for transfer to the General Fund for 
traffic regulation and control. Again, in May, 1976, $1,500,000 
was declared surplus from this fund for transfer to the General 
Fund for the same purpose. 

Legislation was approved in June, 1976 amending the Traffic Code to 
provide that parking meter funds in excess of $1,500,000 (originally 
$938,000) be credited to the Off -Street Parking Fund, providing that 
moneys in the fund be used for payment of administrative expenses of 
the parking Authority, thereby eliminating the necessity for alloca- 
tion of funds from Ad Valorem taxes, for certain possessory interest 
taxes and for pledge of past and future indebtedness incurred by the 
issuance of bonds by or on behalf of the City and County for 
acquisition, construction and completion of off-street parking 
facilities. 



-9- 



Financing Time Schedule 



1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco 
estimated that the basic program could be financed in 
its entirety from moneys now on deposit in our "Off- 
Street Parking Fund," plus the estimated increments 
which will be realized up to July 1, 1976. 

2. The Neighborhood Off -Street Parking Program, providing 
off-street parking facilities in these neighborhood 
districts, is as follows: 

Projects approved and in operation ; 22 



District 

Eureka Valley ( Castro Street) 

Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 

Vest Portal (West Portal Avenue) 

West Portal (Claremont-Ulloa Streets) 

Geary ( Geary Boulevard) 

Geary (18th-19th Avenues) 

Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 

Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 

Noe Valley (24th Street) 

Portola (Felton Street) 

Mission (16th and Hoff Streets} 

Mission (24th and Capp Streets; 
**Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 

Clement (8 th Avenue} 

Clement (9th Avenue) 
^Lakeside (junipero Serra and Ocean Avenue) 20) 
^Lakeside (19th and Ocean Avenues) 

North Beach (Vallejo Street) 

Marina (pierce Street) 

Polk (Redding School) 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 

Bay View (Palou-Mendell Streets) 



Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 


$ 79,768 


21 


145,858 


20 


155,490 


24 


192,650 


22 


101,155 


56 


164,486 


56 


208,591 


25 


111,018 


16 


55,947 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


19 


88,862 


228 


645,800 


55 


155,254 


28 


108,440 


20) 
21) 
165 


42,025 


874,645 


82 


855,622 


40 


257,551 


50 


151,217 


J£ 


88,785 


m 


84. 763, 269 



^Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street Parking 
Program March, 19 65. 



**Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street Parking 
Program June, 1974 • 



-10- 



Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized 
as follows: 

Policy Point No» 1 : (Private financing) 

1. Completed 



a. 1975-1976 

b. 1949-1975 

c. Total 



381 stalls 
29,766 " 
30,147 " 



11. Total under No. 1 
Policy Point No. 2 ; (Public-private financing) 
1. Completed 



a. 1975-1976 

b. 1949-1975 

c. Total 



500 stalls 
9,061 » 
9T56T » 



11. Under development 

a. 1975-1976 875 stalls 

111. Total under No. 2 
Policy Point No. 3 : (Public financing) 
1 . Completed 



a. 1975-1976 

b. 1949-1975 

c. Total 

11. Under development 
a. 1975-1976 
111. Total under No. 3 
GRAND TOTAL 



-0- stalls 
1,257 
1,257 



343 stalls 



30,147 stalls 



10,436 stalls 



1,600 stalls 
12,183 stalls 



The actual projected total cost of this program is approximately $55 million, 
of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, only about $9 
million will have required public financing; roughly only about 16$ of the 
total. 

Conflict of Interest Code 

In compliance with provisions of the Political Reform Act of 1974 
and Board of Supervisors' Resolution No. 191-76, the Parking 
Authority adopted its Conflict of Interest Code applicable to 
its specific requirements by Resolution No. 594 on June 24, 1976. 



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-14- 



PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 



Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 and issued) $5,000,000.00 

Transferred to Account 252,684.59 

Appropriated $5,232,684-59 

Expended 5,230,438*41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 



Unappropriated balance June 30, 1976 $ 367,579*81 



♦Account closed June 30, I960, Surplus funds 
transferred to Unappropriated Account No. 1990. 



All outstanding bonds have matured, have been presented for 
payment and will no longer constitute an obligation of the 
City. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of Mayors Joseph L. Alioto and George R. 
Moscone, the Chief Administrative Officer, Members of the Board of 
Supervisors, the City Attorney, Controller, Director of Property, 
Director of Public Works, City Engineer, Traffic Engineer, Director 
of Planning, the private garage industry, the public-spirited citizens 
comprising the corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others 
who have given so generously of their time and contributed so greatly 
to the advancement of its program during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 







Arthur S. Becker 
Director 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



1976-1977 



JAN 6 1978 




DOCUMENTS OCPT. 
§,& PUBLIC .LIBRARY 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

RICHARD J. GUGGENHIME, JR. 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 



Staff: 
MARGARET L. BRADY, Director 



HONORABLE GEORGE R. MOSCONE, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

I. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 1 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION , 1-2 

IV. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS . 2 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction . 2 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction 2-5 

Policy Point No. 3 - Direct Public Financing 

and Construction 5~7 

V. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 8-10 

VI. PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND ........ 11 

VII. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ... 11 

VIII. MAP OF PARKING FACILITIES 




Honorable George R. Moscone, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mayor Moscone: 

On behalf of the Members of the Parking Authority and its Staff, I 
submit herewith the report of the San Francisco Parking Authority 
for the fiscal year 1976-1977 . 

The activities and accomplishments of the Authority are summarized 
in the following paragraphs: 

1. The Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Need Report 
No. 2 - Parking Treatments - was presented to the parking 
Authority by the Department of Public Works, Bureau of 
Engineering, at its Regular Meeting of January 20, 1977 • 
Funds in the amount of $1,227,600 from the Off -Street 
Parking Fund have been requested to implement this 
programo Also, funds in the amount of $44^,000 have 
been requested from the Off -Street Parking Fund to 
purchase 5»600 parking meters, 1,200 of which will be 
earmarked for this neighborhood program. 

Unique unto this program is the fact that the addition of 
approximately 757 parking spaces will be accomplished 
without the condemnation of any property from the City 
tax rolls. The program calls for the narrowing of sidewalks 
and/or the use of angle parking in order to provide the 
additional spaces. The cost per space is significantly less 
than that experienced when off-street property is acquired. 

2* The Board of Supervisors has approved proceeding with the 
Performing Arts Center Garage, pending signing of the 
Contract Agreement between the Chief Administrative 
Officer and Sponsors of the San Francisco Performing 
Arts Center which is expected in late September or early 
October. The Environmental Impact Report has been accepted 
by the Department of City Planning. 

3. The City of San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation 
approved $447 » 500 to tie together the newly expanded 
section and the original Sutter-Stockton Garage. The 
facility is in full operation and showing capacity 
occupancy. 

4« Rate increases at the Fifth and Mission and Portsmouth 
Square Garages were approved by the Parking Authority in 
September, 197& a^cL by the Board of Supervisors in October, 
1976 



-2- 



5« Rate changes to include the parking tax increase from IQffi 
to I59& were approved by the Parking Authority in November, 
1976 in accordance with Board of Supervisors' action 
requiring this change. 

6. $2,188 was approved from the off -Street Parking Fund for 
traffic congestion relief by creating stacking lanes on 
Kearny and Clay Streets approaching the Portsmouth Square 
Garage entrance. 

7. An additional $5,000 was approved from the Off -Street Parking 
Fund for the purpose of providing further information required 
by the Department of City Planning before submitting their 
final review oi" the Environmental Impact Report on this 
facility. 

8. Although there was no progress on the Yerba Buena Project 
during the fiscal year 1976-77 » the Parking Authority continues 
to be considered the agency to provide low-cost public parking. 
The sponsors have indicated that the Authority will be 
reimbursed for money loaned from the Oif-Street Parking Fund 
for relocation of the Howard Street sewer. 

Mr. Arthur S. Becker retired as Director of the Authority on January Jl, 
1977* having completed 15 years of outstanding service to the Authority 
and to the City. It is to him that this report is dedicated. 

Mrs. Margaret L. Brady was appointed Director to succeed. Mr. Becker, 
having come to the Authority from the Public Utilities Commission 
where she served as Secretary to the Commission. Mrs. Brady's 
background in City government and her strong administrative 
abilities have made the transition an easy one. 

For a more detailed analysis of the operating results of the various 
facilities and for additional information on the status of the City's 
parking program, I refer you to the report itself. 



Respectfully su 



/Jm 



Donald Magnin 
Chairman 





City and County of San Francisco Parking Authority 

Members: 

DONALD MAGNIN 
Chairman 

RICHARD J. GUGGENHIME 
FRANCIS H. LOUIE 
MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 
ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

GEORGE R. MOSCONE, Mayor MARGARET L. BRADY 

Director 

STATEMENT OP ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Prancisco 
Fiscal year ending June 30, 1977 

The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1976-1977 1 
together with supplemental information, is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's 
four (4) quarterly Reports. 

PA RKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Prancisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Pive Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, including the Director. 
PARKING AITHORITY BUDGET 



1975-1976 


$60,310 


1976-1977 


$61,$10 


Past ten-year average 


$49,052 


PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 



The Parking Law of 1949 recognized that additional parking facilities 
and the performance of all undertakings incidental to such facilities 
are public uses and purposes for which public money may be spent and 
private property acquired and are governmental functions. (California 
Streets and Highways Code. Sec. 32501). 

Pursuant to this legislative notice, the State Legislature permitted, 
subject to the determination by the local legislative body, that there 
is need for an authority to function, a public body corporate and 
politic known as the parking authority of the city. The San Francisco 
Board of Supervisors recognized the need for such a parking authority, 



-2- 



and the Administrative Code, Chapter 17 , expressed this need and assigned 
jurisdiction and control over parking projects to the parking Authority of 
the City and County of San Francisco. 

The State Code (Sec. 32656, Streets and Highways) mandated a five-member 
authority. Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, in October 1949i appointed, with 
confirmation by the Board of Supervisors, the first Chairman and Members 
of the San Francisco Parking Authority. 

The Parking Authority is authorized to issue revenue bonds, acquire 
property, sell property, construct public parking facilities and public 
rights of way convenient thereto, and to administer facilities to be 
used as off-street parking lots and garages. Such facilities may 
provide for the performance of services to the public incidental or 
advantageous to public parking projects and which are reasonably 
necessary to utilize such property as a public parking facility for 
the purpose of regulating, controlling and relieving the congestion 
of street traffic. 

The Authority is responsible for the proper performance of lessees or 
operators of public parking facilities and the promotion of the public 
interest. The administration, books and records of such operators are 
subject to Authority scrutiny. 

Finally, the Authority advises the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors 
on all matters pertaining to off-street parking and the parking and 
traffic control regulatory field. 



POLICY. PROGBAM AMD ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the 
Authority's policy and program adopted February 8, 1950. 

Policy Point Ho. 1 ; Stimulation of and cooperation with private 

enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 

New parking facilities reported, 

completed and placed in operation 

during fiscal year 1976-1977 2,707 stalls 

These additions brought the total of 

new off-street parking spaces provided 

under this phase of the Authority 

program since October 6, 1949 » to 52,864 stalls 

Policy Point No. 2 ; Public cooperation with private enterprise 

to provide off-street parking by public 
provision! of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing. 



-3- 



Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

The following parking facilities have "been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 



Name 

*Union Square 
Garage 

Marshall Square 
parking Plaza 

Civic Center 
Auto Park 



Total 
Stall Construction Project 

Completed Capacity Land Cost Cost Cost 



September 11, 1,081 $ -0- 
1942 



$1, 646, 531 $1,646,331 



November 1, 
1948 

December 18, 
1953 



St. Mary's Square May 12, 1954 
Garage 



Garage 

Golden Gateway 
Garage 



1962 



Japanese Cultural February 16, 
Center Garages 1968 



111 



276 



-0- 
-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



$ 31 1 000 31,000 

828 $ 417,513 2,300,000 2,717,513 



Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 


July 1, 1957 


20 


**Ellis-0'Farrell 
Garage 


August 5, 
1957 


900 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 


August 28, 
1958 


938 


Expansion I 


November 21, 
1961 


534 


Expansion II 


February 6, 
1970 


316 


Sut ter-Sto ckton 
Garage 


November 19, 
I960 


870 


Expansion I 


July 1,1976 


555 


Portsmouth Square 


August 24, 


504 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



2,800,000 



938 1,690,970 2,966,697 4,657,667 

-0- 1,000,000 1,000,000 

258,100 1,188,700 1,446,800 

2,665,069 3,837,177 6,502,246 

1,000,000 5,166,847 6,166,847 

-0- 3,181,500 3,181,500 



December 21, 1,000 1,090,000 6,135,000 7,225,000 
1966 



850 256,640 3,750,000 4,006,640 



*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired and, 
effective August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Management 
and Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining assets 



-4- 

to the City, the Union Square Garage Corporation filed a certificate of winding 
up and dissolution with the Secretary of State^ A new operating lease was 
executed between the City and a private garage operator for a period of ten 
years and nine months commencing October 1, 1967 • 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it was 
acquired by the City. 

Sutter-Stockton Garage Expansion I 

The City of San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation approved 
$447,500 to tie together the newly expanded section and the 
original garage to make it one complete facility. 

Yerba Buena Garages 

Although there has been no progress on this project during the 
fiscal year 1976-77 » the Parking Authority continues to be 
considered the agency to provide low-cost public parking. In . 
June, 1972, the Parking Authority and the Board of Supervisors 
approved the use of Off -Street Parking Funds in the amount of 
$1,536,580.11 for relocation of the Howard Street sewer to allow 
construction of the Yerba Buena Convention Center to proceed. 
The sponsors have indicated that the Authority will be reimbursed 
for this amount from the sale of revenue bonds when the proceeds 
are available. 

Performing Arts Center 

The Parking Authority and the Board of Supervisors approved and 
recommended in principle a proposal from the Sponsors of San 
Francisco Performing Arts canter for a public off-street parking 
facility, the issuance of revenue bonds by the Parking Authority 
for the construction of this facility, and the pledge of parking 
meter revenue to meet debt service requirements. Signing of the 
Contract Agreement between the Chief Administrative officer and 
the Sponsors of the Performing Arts Center is expected in late 
September or early October, 1977* The garage is to be located 
on the north side of Grove Street between Fulton and Gough Streets 
and will provide parking for 598 vehicles. The Environmental Impact 
Report has been accepted by the Department of City Planning. 

Parking Rate Increases 

Rate increases for the Fifth and Mission, Portsmouth Square and 
Vallejo Street Garages were approved by the Parking Authority 
and the Board of Supervisors. 

San Francisco Municipal Parking Tax 

Legislation reducing the Off -Street Parking Tax from 25$ to 10$ 
was approved by the Board of Supervisors to become effective 
July 1, 1972. 



-5- 

During this fiscal year, legislation was approved by the Parking 
Authority and Board of Supervisors increasing the parking tax 
from 10^ to IJfo to become effective November 15, 1976 to continue 
to and include June JO, 1977 1 & t which time the tax was to revert 
to that effective as of November 16, 197° • 

Downtown Short-term Parking Plan 

Following approval by the Board of Supervisors of an increase 
in the downtown parking meter rates and approval of the use of 
$280,000 from the Off -Street Parking Fund, 6,000 250 parking 
meters were installed in the downtown core area of San Francisco. 

A non-profit corporation formed under the name of San Francisco 
Central city Parking Corporation has submitted a Letter of Intent 
to the Board of Supervisors and parking Authority to aid and 
assist the City and County of San Francisco in the acquisition, 
construction and financing of a parking facility at the southeast 
corner of Mission and Steuart Streets under the name of Embarcadero 
Garage, with a capacity of 475 stalls. 

Legislation approving the Joint Working Agreement between the City 
and County of San Francisco and the Parking Authority for use of 
off-street parking funds for an Environmental Impact Report in 
the amount of $20,000 was approved by the Parking Authority and 
the Board of Supervisors and is in the process of review by the 
Department of City Planning. 

An additional $5,000 was approved by the Parking Authority from 
the Off-Street Parking Fund for the purpose of providing additional 
information on sociological and economic factors required by the 
Department of City Planning before submitting their final review 
of the Environmental Impact Report on this proposed facility. 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by government and private business under the parking 
Authority program to date totals 9,568 parking stalls . 

Policy Point No. 5 : Direct public financing and construction, including 

site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 

Constructed in this Category 

**Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

^Lakeside Village Parking Plazas I and II 4$ stalls 

Seventh and Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

*l'he City originally acquired the sites for the two Lakeside 
Village neighborhood lots located at Ocean Avenue and Junipero 
Serra Boulevard and Ocean and Nineteenth Avenues, constructed 
parking lots thereon and leased them to the Lakeside Village 
Merchants' Association for a period of twenty years, commencing 



-6- 



October 1, 195^. On January 28, 1965» the merchants' association 
requested the City and County of San Francisco to cancel the 
existing lease on the two lots and include them in the Neighbor- 
hood Off-Street Parking Program. In March, 1965? the Lakeside 
Village Parking Plazas I and II were designated as municipal 
off-street parking lots and parking meter regulations were 
established for their operation. 

^During the fiscal year 1973-74, conversion of this parking 

facility and its inclusion into the Neighborhood Parking Program 
was completed and the facility officially opened June 14, 1974* 
It is now a parking meter operation with 128 2-hour meters and 
100 8-hour meters. 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31, 
1961 for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City is a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. The program comprises 5 

20 public parking lots, and 
2 public parking garages, in 
15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 
987 parking stall capacity, for 
$4,763,269 approximate cost 

Use of Off-Street Parking Fund 

Funds in the amount of $27,000 from the Off-Street Parking Fund 
were approved for a City-wide parking study by the City Engineer 
to re-evaluate the present municipal parking lots and the need 
for additional off-street parking facilities in Neighborhood 
Shopping Districts. Report No. 1 containing results of parking 
surveys conducted during the Fall of 1975 has been received. 

The Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Need Report No. 2 - 
Parking Treatments - was presented to the Parking Authority by 
the Department of Public Works, Bureau of Engineering, in 
January, 1977. A Supplemental Appropriation Request in the 
amount of $1,227,600 from the Off-Street Parking Fund has been 
submitted to implement this program. 

A Supplemental Appropriation Request has been approved in the 
amount of $448,000 from the Off-Street Parking Fund to purchase 
5,600 parking meters, 1,200 of which will be earmarked for this 
neighborhood program. 

$3,188 was approved from the Off-Street Parking Fund for traffic 
congestion relief by creating stacking lanes on Kearny and Clay 
Streets approaching the Portsmouth Square G-axage entrance. 



-7- 



$66,000 from the Off-Street Parking Fund was approved by the 
parking Authority to supplement funds from the City of San 
Francisco Civic Plaza Parking Corporation's Contingency 
Reserve Account for elevator rebuilding and reconstruction 
in the Civic Center Plaza Garage. This request was not 
approved by the Board of Supervisors. 



Financing Time Schedule 



1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco 
estimated that the basic program could be financed in 
its entirety from moneys now on deposit in our "Off- 
Street Parking Fund," plus the estimated increments 
which will be realized up to July 1, 1977* 

2. The Neighborhood Off -Street Parking Program, providing 
off-street parking facilities in these neighborhood 
districts, is as follows: 

Projects approved and in operation ; 22 



District 

Eureka Valley ( Castro Street) 

Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 

West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 

West Portal (claremont-Ulloa Streets) 

Geary ( Geary Boulevard) 

Geary (18th-19th Avenues) 

Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 

Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 

Hoe Valley (24th Street) 

Portola (Felton Street) 

Mission f 16th and Hoff Streets} 

Mission (24th and Capp Streets) 
**Mission-Bartlett Parking plaza 

Clement (8th Avenue) 

Clement (9th Avenue; 
*Lakeside (junipero Serra and Ocean Avenue) 
*Lakeside (19th and Ocean Avenues) 

North Beach (Vallejo Street) 

Marina (pierce Street) 

Polk (Redding School) 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 

Bay View (Palou-Mendell Streets) 



•^Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street 
Parking Program March, 1965. 

■^Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street 
Parking Program June, 1974* 



Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 


$ 79,768 


21 


143,838 


20 


135,490 


24 


192,650 


22 


101,133 


36 


164,486 


36 


208,391 


25 


111,018 


16 


53,947 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


19 


88,862 


228 


645,800 


33 


153,254 


28 


108,440 


20) 
21) 


42,025 


163 


874,645 


82 


855,622 


40 


257,351 


30 


131,217 


-15 


88,785 



282 



£4.763,269 



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.11- 



PRESENT STATUS UP 1947 PARKING BOND FOND 



Original Bond Pund (authorized 1947 and issued) $5,000,000.00 

Transferred to Account 232,684.59 

Appropriated $5,232,684.59 

Expended 5,230,438.41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 



Unappropriated balance June 30, 1977 % 381,199.06 



^Account closed June 30, i960, Surplus funds 
transferred to Unappropriated Account No. 1990 • 



All outstanding "bonds have matured, have been presented for 
payment and will no longer constitute an obligation of the 
City. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of Mayor George R. Moscone, the Chief 
Administrative Officer, Members of the Board of Supervisors, the City 
Attorney, Controller, Director of Property, Director of Public Works, 
City Engineer, Traffic Engineer, Director of Planning, the private 
garage industry, the public-spirited citizens comprising the corporations 
sponsoring many major projects, and others who have given so generously 
of their time and contributed so greatly to the advancement of its program 
during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OP SAN FRANCISCO 



Margaret L. Brady (J 



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PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

RICHARD J. GUGGENHIME, JR. 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 



MARGARET L. BRADY, Director 



HONORABLE GEORGE R. MOSCONE, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



TABLE OP CONTENTS 

Page 

CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

I. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 1 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 1-2 

IV. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction . • • 2 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction 2-7 

V. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 8-10 

VI. PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 11 

VII. MAP OF PARKING FACILITIES 




Honorable George R. Mo scone, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco CA 94102 

Dear Mayor Mo a cone: 

On behalf of the Members of the parking Authority and its Staff, I 
submit herewith the report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for 
the fiscal year 1977-78. 

The activities and accomplishments of the authority are summarized in 
the following paragraphs: 

1. The Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Need Report 
No. 2 - Parking Treatments - is being implemented. The 
Mayor's budget office asked that we rescind our request 
to encumber $1,227,600 from the Off -Street parking Fund 
and prepare "as needed" requests. 

We have been fortunate in hiring a CETA employee to assist 
DPV in the neighborhood surveys. Work is progressing on 
Polk Street - $32,900 for feasibility and public hearing. 

The Board of Supervisors has also approved: 

$30,800 for Mission/Bartlett second deck feasibility; 
$2,500 for a feasibility study of under-playfield parking 

at George Peabody School, 7th Avenue between Clement 
and California streets; 
$58,000 for a feasibility study of 798 on-street parking 
spaces in various neighborhoods; 
$1,185 for minor modifications and repairs of facilities. 

2. The Performing Arts Garage has received all approvals, EIR, 
City Planning, Arts Commission and Board of Supervisors. A 
suit was filed by WAPAC, which is holding up final transfer 
of property from the Redevelopment Agency. At this writing 
(August 7 1 1978) the Superior Court has declared the suit 
"off calendar" and start of construction and issuance of 
bonds will follow shortly. 

J. Rate increases based on increased wage contracts were 

approved by the Parking Authority and subsequently by the 
Board of Supervisors for the following facilities: 

Civic Center Plaza Garage 
Portsmouth Square Garage 
Ellis-o'Farrell Garage 
Fifth and Mission Garage 
Japanese cultural Center 



-2- 



4* Rate changes were considered to reduce all rates to 
conform with a 10% parking tax pursuant to Board of 
Supervisors action. However, the Board of Supervisors 
reconsidered and kept the parking tax at the 15% level. 

5* The Yerba Buena Project will break ground for the Conven- 
tion Center in late 1978* The parking Authority has been 
requested to meet with the Redevelopment Agency and the 
Chief Administrator's office with regard to proposed low- 
cost public parking. 

Miss Helen Ellis, the parking Authority secretary since its inception, 
retired during the past year. On behalf of the members of the Autho- 
rity, past and present, I extend to her our sincere thanks for her many 
years of service and wish her much happiness in the days to come. We 
have been most fortunate in obtaining the services of Mrs. Lucy Clancy 
to replace Miss Ellis. 

Messrs. Francis Louie and Achilla Muschi were reappointed by Mayor 
Moscone. 




'ully submitted, 



c^U^ 



Donald Magnin 
Chairman 





City and County off San Francisco Parking Authority 

Members: 

DONALD MAGNIN 
Chairman 

RICHARD J. GUGGENHIME 
FRANCIS H. LOUIE 
MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 
ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

3EORGE R. MOSCONE, Mayor MARGARET L BRADY 

Director 



STATEMENT OP ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Prancisco 
Fiscal year ending June 20, 1978 

The report of the parkins Authority for the fiscal year 1977-7$ » together 
with supplemental information, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in the attached copy of the Authority's 
official annual report. 



PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATIO N 

The San Prancisco parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, including the Director. 
PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 



1976-1977 


$61,510 


1977-1978 


91,596 


Past ten-year average 


54,269 



PARKING AUTHORIT Y FUNCTION 

The parking Law of 1949 recognized that the provision of additional park- 
ing facilities and the performance of all undertakings incidental to pro- 
viding such facilities are public uses and purposes for which public money 
may be spent and private property acquired and are governmental functions. 
(California streets and Highways Code. Sec. 52501). 

Pursuant to this legislative notice, the State Legislature permitted, 
subject to the determination by the local legislative body that there is 
need for an authority to function, a public body corporate and politic 
known as the Parking Authority of the City and County of San Francisco. 
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors recognized the need for such a 
parking authority, and the Administrative Code, Chapter 17, expressed this 



415) 558-3651 450 McAllister Street, Room 603 San Francisco, CA 94102 



-2- 

need arid assigned jurisdiction and control over parking projects to the 
parking Authority of the City and County of San Francisco. 

The State Code (Sec. 32656, Streets and Highways) mandated a five-member 
authority. Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, in October 1949 > appointed, with 
confirmation by the Board of Supervisors, the first Chairman and Members 
of the San Francisco parking Authority, 

The parking Authority is authorized to issue revenue bonds, acquire 
property, sell property, construct public parking facilities and public 
rights of way convenient thereto, and to administer facilities to be 
used as off-street parking lots and garages. Such facilities may provide 
for the performance of services to the public incidental or advantageous 
to public parking projects and which are reasonably necessary to utilize 
such property as a public parking facility for the purpose of regulating, 
controlling and relieving the congestion of street traffic. 

The Authority is responsible for the proper performance of lessees or 
operators of public parking facilities and the promotion of the public 
interest. The administration, books and records of such operators are 
subject to Authority scrutiny. 

Finally, the Authority advises the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors on 
all matters pertaining to off-street parking and the parking and traffic 
control regulatory field, 

POLICY. PROGRAM AKD ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the 
Authority's policy and program adopted February 8, 1950. 

Policy Point Ho. 1 ; Stimulation of and cooperation with private 

enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 

New parking facilities reported, 

completed and placed in operation 

during fiscal year 1977-1978 992 stalls 

These additions brought the total 

of new off-street parking spaces 

provided under this phase of the 

Authority program since October 6, 

1949, to j? ,856 stalls 

Pol icy Point TJo„ 2> Public cooperation with private enterprise 

to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provlatop of the construo-fci-on financing. 



-3- 



Constructed and in Operation in this category 

The following peaking facilities have been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 



Name 



Stall 
Completed Capacity Land Cost 



Total 

Construction Project 

Cost Cost 

$1,646,351 $1,646,331 

-0- -0- 

4,298,822 4,298,822 

2,300,000 2,717,513 

-0- 2,800,000 

2,966,697 4,657,667 

1,000,000 1,000,000 

1,188,700 1,446,800 

3,837,177 6,502,246 

5,166,847 6,166,847 

3,181,500 3,181,500 

6,135,000 7,225,000 

3,750,000 4,006,640 



*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired and, effective 
August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Management and Occupancy 
to the City. After transferring its remaining assets to the City, the Union 
Square Garage Corporation filed a certificate of winding up and dissolution with 
the Secretary of State. A new operating lease was executed between the city and 
private garage operator for a period of ten years and nine months commencing 
October 1, 1967. 



*Union Square 
Garage 


September 11, 
1942 


1,081 


% -0- 


Marshall Square 
Parking plaza 


November 1, 
1948 


111 


-0- 


Civic Center 
Garage 


March 1, 
I960 


84O 


-0- 


St. Mary's Square 
Garage 


May 12, 1954 


828 


417,513 


**Ellie-0 ' Farrell 
Garage 


August 5, 
1957 


900 


-0- 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 


August 28, 
1958 


930 


1,690,970 


Expansion I 


November 21, 
1961 


534 


-0- 


Expansion II 


February 6, 
1970 


316 


258,100 


Sutt er-Sto ckton 
Garage 


November 19, 
I960 


870 


2,665,069 


Expansion I 


July 1, 1976 


555 


1,000,000 


Portsmouth Square 
Garage 


August 24, 
1962 


504 


-0- 


Golden Gateway 
Garage 


December 21, 
1966 


1,000 


1,090,000 


Japanese Cultural 
Center Garages 


February 16, 
1968 


850 


256,640 



-4- 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it was 
acquired by the City, 

Forest Hill parking plaza was phased out because it was found to be operating 
at a loss* 

Civic Center Auto park property was transferred to the performing Arts 
Center with the understanding that parking in the area would be replaced 
by the performing Arts Center Garage. 

Yerba Buena Garages 

Construction of the Yerba Buena convention Center will begin in 
August of 1978* The parking Authority will work with the Redevel- 
opment Agency and the City planning Department to provide low-cost 
public parking, in June, 1972 » the parking Authority and the 
Board of Supervisors approved the use of Off -Street parking Funds 
in the amount of $1,556,580.11 for relocation of the Howard Street 
sewer to allow construction of the Yerba Buena convention Center 
to proceed. The sponsors have indicated that the Authority will 
be reimbursed for this amount from the sale of revenue bonds when 
the proceeds are available. 

Performing Arts Center Garage 

The parking Authority and the Board of Supervisors approved the 
project lease for the Performing Arts Center Garage. The parking 
Authority has approved the EIR, final plans and specifications, 
as well as having employed bond counsel, bond consultant, trustee, 
insurance carrier and construction consultant. The bids for 
construction and the sizing of the bond issue are temporarily 
in abeyance pending the decision of the Superior Court to recog- 
nize a demurrer in regard to a citizen legal action. The garage 
is to be located on the north side of Grove Street between Fulton 
and Gough Streets and will provide parking for 598 vehicles. 

Parking Rate Increases 

Rate increases due to increased labor costs were approved by the 
parking Authority and the Board of Supervisors for the following 
facilities : 

Ellis-0 'Farrell 
Fifth and Mission 
Sutt er-S to ckton 
Japanese cultural Center 
Civic Center plaza 
Portsmouth Square 

San Francisco Municipal parking Tax 

In November 1976 the Board of Supervisors raised the parking tax 



-5- 

from 10% to 15% to revert to 10% as of June 30, 1977. When the 
matter was brought before the Board, it was their decision to 
continue the tax at 15% because of fiscal problems incurred by 
Proposition 13. The 5% additional tax will be used for senior 
citizen programs. 

Downtown Short-term parking plan 

There have been no new parking facilities considered during this 
fiscal year. New short-term parking is being considered for the 
Yerba Buena project. The parking Authority will meet with the 
Redevelopment Agency and the Chief Administrative Officer as to 
the possibility of joint venture projects with either housing or 
office entrepreneurs as well as retail outlets to provide short- 
term, low-cost parking. 

The Parking Authority has contacted all of the garage operators 
and requested the reduction of all monthly parking by attrition 
to afford more short-term spaces. Rates have been increased for 
over four-hour parking to discourage long-term parking. 

The present capacity of City off-street parking projects under 
the parking Authority to date totals 9»741» 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 
and Use of Off -Street parking Fund 

The Mayor and Board of Supervisors have requested the parking Authority to 
place emphasis on neighborhood shopping districts to encourage and facilitate 
business within the City. 

At the request of the Mayor's Budget Office, the parking Authority rescinded 
an encumbrance of the Off -Street parking Fund in the amount of $1,227»600 for 
the Neighborhhod parking Program, The parking Authority has been asked to 
request sums on an as-needed basis. 

We have requested, and the Board of Supervisors has approved, funds from 
the Off-Street Parking Fund as follows; 



Feasibility for double decking 
Mission-Bartlett Parking plaza 

Feasibility of Polk Street 
Neighborhood On-Street Treatment 

New Fence at 18th & Castro lot 





Proposed New 
parking Spaces 


Proposed 
Capital 

Expenditures 


$50,800.00 


126 


$713,250 


32,900.00 


211 


421,250 


82.68 







-6- 



Feasibility of parking area under 

George Peabody School area 2,500.00 

Feasibility of city-wide on-street 
treatment in various neighborhoods 58 * 000. 00 



Feasibility for double decking 
Marina parking lot 

Restriping of Lakeshore plaza 
parking lots (2) 



To General Fund 

The Mayor and Board of 
Supervisors requested the park- 
ing Authority to delay proposed 
capital improvements in light of 
Proposition 15 and to aid the 
General Fund in this time of need. 

International Municipal parking 

Congress 

The parking Authority and the 
Board of Supervisors agreed that 
the parking Authority Director 
should attend this important 
convention for professional infor- 
mation and study. The money was 
returned to the fund when all 
management personnel of the City 
were requested to be available for 
consultation after passage of Prop- 
osition 15. 



2,000.00 



258.00 
1,500,000.00 



45 


To be 
established 


r 98 


466,550 


44 


665,500 



(700.00) 



Projects approved and in operation ; 21 



District 

Eureka Valley ( Castro Street 
Eureka valley (Collingwood Street) 
West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 
Vest Portal (claremont-UUoa streets) 
Geary (Geary Boulevard) 
Geary (18th-19th Avenues) 
Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 
Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 
Noe Valley (24th Street) 
Porto la (Felton Street) 
Mission (16th and Hoff Streets) 
Mission (24th and capp Streets) 
**Mission-Bartlett parking plaza 



parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 


$ 79,768 


21 


145,858 


20 


155,490 


24 


192,650 


22 


101,155 


56 


164,486 


56 


208,591 


25 


111,018 


16 


55,947 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


19 


88,862 


228 


645,800 



-7- 

Clement (8th Avenue) 33 153,254 

Clement (9th Avenue) 28 108,440 

*Lakeside (juniperro Serra and Ocean Avenue) 20) . 0?c . 

*Lakeside (19 th and Ocean Avenues) 21) 4 ' 5 

North Beach (vallejo Street) 163 874,645 

Marina (pierce Street) 82 855,622 

Polk (Redding School) 40 257,351 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 30 131,217 



^Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street 
parking Program March, 1965. 

■x-XTransferred to Neighborhood Off -Street 
Parking Program June, 1974* 



972 $4,674,484 



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-11- 



PRESENT STATUS OP 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 



Original Bond pund (authorized 1947 a^d- issued) $5 , OOO, 000. 00 

Transferred to Account 252,684,59 

Appropriated $5,232,684.59 

Expended 5,250,438.41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 

Unappropriated balance June 30, 1978 $ 395,501.99 

*Ac count closed June 30 » I960, Surplus funds 
transferred to Unappropriated Account No. 1990. 



All outstanding bonds have matured, have been presented for 
payment and will no longer constitute an obligation of the City* 



Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OP THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OP SAN PRANCISCO 



Director 

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ANNUAL REPORT 



1978-1979 



gam? 




THg PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

AMANCIO G. ERGINA 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 



MARGARET L. BRADY, Director 



HONORABLE DIANNE FEINSTEIN, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 1 

PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 2 

FACILITIES CONSTRUCTED AND IN OPERATION 3 

NEIGHBORHOOD SHOPPING DISTRICT PARKING FACILITIES 

AND USE OF OFF-STREET PARKING FUND 4 

PROJECTS APPROVED AND IN OPERATION 5 

REPORT OF DIRECTOR MARGARET BRADY 6-7 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 8-10 

PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 11 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 11 

MAP OF PARKMG FACILITIES 




Honorable Dianne Feinstein 

City and County of San Francisco 

2u0 City Hail 

San Francisco CA 94102 

Dear Mayor Feins tein: 

Un behalf of the Members of the paricing Authority and its Staff, I submit 
herewith the report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal 
year 197^-79- 

The activities and accomplishments of the Authority are submitted in the 
following paragraphs: 

1. The Neighborhood Snopping District Parking Weed Report No. 
2 Parking Treatments is progressing with some setbacks 
resulting from public hearings: 

a. The Marina parKing facility double -de eking has been 
approved and funds appropriated. Construction will 
commence as soon as the City Planning Commission 
gives approval. 

b. Mission-Bartlett double -de eking has been approved. 
Funds will be made available when construction bids 
are approved and the Planning Commission concurs. 

c. Public hearings on plans for on-street treatment for 
Polk Street, North Beach and Chinatown met with opposi- 
tion at public hearings and are being re-drawn for 
suomission in the near future. 

d. The proposal for under-playfield parking at George 
Peabody School met unanimous opposition at puolic 
hearings. The Clement Merchants have withdrawn the 
proposal and on-street treatment is being planned 
in cooperation with neighborhood groups. 

2. The Performing Arts Garage is beset with legal actions. The 
WAPAC suit was dismissed. An action was filed by Pride Founda- 
tion, which action is now on appeal. The Redevelopment Agency 
stands ready -co transfer the property and the Parking Authority 
is awaiting legal approval. 



-2- 



3. The Parking Authority has been named developer for a 
garage site adjacent to the Moscone Convention Center. 
A feasibility study and cost estimates are being pre- 
pared in anticipation of a bond issue to be placed on 
the November ballot. 

4. Rate increases to discourage the long-term parker were 
approved by the Parking Authority and by the Board of 
Supervisors for the following facilities: 

Vallejo Street Garage 

Seventh & Harrison Parking Plaza 

Golden Gateway Garage 

Portsmouth Square Garage 

Japanese Cultural Center 

Mar shall Square Paricing Plaza 

5. unce again the Members of the Grand Jury awarded the Park- 
ing Authority an A-One rating for performance and in partic- 
ular for cooperation with and use of funds for other City 
Departments. 

o. Member Richard Guggenhime was appointed to the Board of 
Permit Appeals and Dr. Amancio G. hrgina was appointed by 
Mayor Dianne Feinstein to serve his unexpired term. 




Donald. Magnin 
Chairman 



City and County of San Francisco 



Parking Authority 




DIANNE FEINSTEIN. Mayor 



Members: 

DONALD MAGNIN 
Chairman 

AMANCIO G. ERGINA 
FRANCIS H. LOUIE 
MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 
ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

MARGARET L. BRADY 
Director 



STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

City and County of San Francisco 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1979 
•a-************************ 

The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1978-79,, together 
with supplemental information, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

The financial status is set iorth in attached copy of the Authority's 
official annual report. 

PA RKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, including the Director. 



PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Law of 1949 recognized that the provision of additional parking 
facilities and the performance of all undertakings incidental to providing 
such facilities are public uses and purposes for which public money may be 
spent and private property acquired and are governmental functions. 
(California Streets and Highways Code, Sec. 3 2 501). 

Pursuant to this legislative notice, the State Legislature permitted, 
subject to the determination by the local legislative body that there is 
need for an authority to function, a public body corporate and politic 
known as the Parking Authority of the City and County of San Francisco. 
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors recognized the need for such a 
parking authority, and the Administrative Code, Chapter 17, expressed 
this need and assigned jurisdiction and control over parking projects 
to the Parking Authority of the City and County of San Francisco. 

The State Code (Sec. 32656, Streets and Highways) mandated a five-member 
authority. Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, in October 1949, appointed, with con- 
firmation by the Board of Supervisors, the first Chairman and Members of 
the San Francisco Parking Authority. 

The Parking Authority is authorized to issue revenue bonds, acquire 
property, sell property, construct public parking facilities and public 
rights of way convenient thereto, and to administer facilities to be used 
as off-street parking lots and garages. Such facilities may provide for 



(415) 558-3651 



450 McAllister Street, Room 603 



San Fra ncisco, CA 94102 

MNMH 



-2- 



the performance of services to the public incidental or advantageous to 
public parking projects and which are reasonably necessary to utilize such 
property as a public parking facility for the purpose of regulating, con- 
trolling and relieving the congestion of street traffic. 

The Authority is responsible for the proper performance of lessees or 
operators of public parking facilities and the promotion of the public 
interest. The administration, books and records of such operators are 
subject to Authority scrutiny. 

Finally, the Authority advises the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors on 
all matters pertaining to off-street parking and the parking and traffic 
control regulatory field. 



PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 

=?T— r" ' Ll ' ■ ■ ■ 7 * T ■ 

1978-79 - Salaries and Parking Authority 

Administration $ 68,291 

Provided to Other Departments: 

Real Estate Department 12,000 

Light, Heat and Power 4»14^ 

Street Cleaning 58,000 

Bureau of Engineers 10,500 

Tax Collector: Possessory Interest Tax 

Golden Gateway 143,525 

Japan Center 5 8 »025 



-3- 

FACILITIES CONSTRUCTED AND IN OPERATION 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 

Total 
Stall Construction Project 

Name Completed Capacity Land Cost Cost Cost 

*Union Square September 11, 1,081 $ -0- $1,646,351 $1, 646,331 
Garage 1942 

Marshall Square November 1, 111 -0- -0- -0- 
Parking Plaza 1948 

St. Mary's Square May 12, 1954 828 417,513 2,300,000 2, 717 1 513 

Garage 

^Ellis-O'Farrell August 5, 900 -0- -0- 2,800,000 
Garage 1957 

Fifth & Mission August 28, 938 1,690,970 2,966,697 4,657,667 
Garage 1958 

Expansion I November 21, 534 -0- 1,000,000 1,000,000 
1961 

Expansion II February 6, 316 258,100 1,188,700 1,446,800 
1970 

Sutter-Stockton November 19, 870 2,665,069 3,837,177 6,502,246 
Garage 19 60 

Expansion I July 1, 1976 555 1,000,000 5,166,847 6,166,847 

Portsmouth Square August 24, 504 -0- 3,181,500 3,181,500 
Garage 1962 

Golden Gateway December 21, 1,000 1,090,000 6,135,000 7,225,000 
Garage 1966 

Japanese Cultural February 16, 850 256,640 3,750,000 4,006,640 
Center Garages 1968 

*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired and, 
effective August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Management 
and Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining assets 
to the City, the Union Square Garage filed a certificate of winding up and 
dissolution with the Secretary of State. A new operating lease was executed 
between the City and private garage operator for a period of ten years and 
nine months commencing October 1, 1967* 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it was 
acquired by the City. 



-4- 



Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 
and Use of Off -Street Parking Fund 

The Mayor and the Board of Supervisors have requested the parking Authority 
to place emphasis on neighborhood shopping districts to encourage and faci- 
litate business within the City. 

We have requested, and the Board of Supervisors has approved, funds from the 
Off -Street Parking Fund as follows: 



Feasibility for double decking 
Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza &50, 800.00 

Feasibility of Polk Street 

Neighborhood On-Street Treatment 52,900.00 

New fence at 18th & Castro St. 82.68 

Feasibility of parking area under 

George Peabody School area 2,500.00 

Feasibility of city-wide on-street 

treatment of various 

neighborhoods 58,000.00 

Feasibility for double decking 

Marina parking lot 2,000.00 

Eestriping of all City lots 7,208.00 

To General Fund 500,000.00 

The Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors requested the 
Parking Authority to aid 
the General Fund 

International Municipal Parking 

Congress 720.00 

The Parking Authority and the 
Board of Supervisors agreed 
that the Parking Authority 
Director should attend this 
important convention for pro- 
fessional information and study 

Repair portals at Irving Street 

lot between 8th and 9th Avenues 1,200.00 



Proposed New 
Parking Spaces 


Proposed 
Capitol 

Expenditure 


126 


$713,250 


211 


421,250 


45 


To be 
established 


798 


466,550 


44 


665,500 



-5- 



Revenue study and prel i mi nary 

plans, soil investigation and 

report necessary for a ballot 

proposal to issue "bonds for 

off-street parking facility at 

George Moscone Convention Center 7^|000.00 



Repairs at Marshall Square 
Parking Plaza 

Performing Arts Garage - 
legal fees 



31,000.00 



15,000.00 



Projects approved and in operation : 21 



District 

Eureka Valley ( Castro Street) 

Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 

West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 

Vest Portal (Claremont-Ulloa Streets) 

Geary ( Geary Boulevard) 

Geary (18th-l9th Avenues) 

Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 

Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 

Noe Valley (24th Street) 

Portola (Felton Street) 

Mission (16th and Hoff Streets} 

Mission (24th and Capp Streets) 
*-*Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 

Clement ( 8th Avenue) 

Clement (9th Avenue) 
■^Lakeside (junipero Serra and Ocean Avenue) 
*Lakeside (19 th and Ocean Avenues) 

North Beach (Vallejo Street) 

Marina (Pierce Street) 

Polk (Redding School) 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 



■^Transferred to Neighborhood off -Street 
Parking Program March, 1965 

**Transf erred to Neighborhood Off -Street 
Parking Program June, 1974 



760 



972 



7,100,000 

Bond Issue 



600 


5,300,000- 




Bond Issue 


Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 


tf 79,768 


21 


143,838 


20 


135,490 


24 


192,650 


22 


101,133 


36 


164,486 


36 


208,391 


25 


111,018 


16 


53,947 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


19 


88,862 


228 


645,800 


33 


153,254 


28 


108,440 


20) 
21) 


42,025 


163 


874,645 


82 


855,622 


40 


257,351 


J£ 


131.217 



$4,674,484 



-6- 



Report of 
Director Margaret Brady 



Parking Study Repor t 



Public hearings for feasibility of adding 211 on-street parking spaces along 
Polk Street were held in two sessions north and south of California Street. 
Objections from persons in the neighborhood and from Municipal Railway plan- 
ning indicate this project must be redrawn and consequently reheard to insure 
a plan attractive to all persons of the area. 

Similar response was engendered from public hearings for the North Beach- 
Chinatown area. 

Public hearings on feasibility of a parking area beneath George Peabody 
School were summarily opposed by neighbors. Plans are being drawn for on- 
street parking on numbered avenues from First to Tenth. 

Other neighborhood areas are to have public hearings in the near future. 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 

Public hearings were overwhelmingly supportive of double decking Mission- 
Bartlett Parking Plaza. 

The Parking Authority has been approached by Housing Development & Neighbor- 
hood Preservation Corp., a non-profit neighborhood corporation, as to air 
rights over the proposed second deck for a housing development. The Parking 
Authority has indicated support of this program when and if it is found 
feasible by HDD and/or other housing agencies. 

Meantime, the Parking Authority has a proposal for the second deck which 
will go to bid within the year. Provisions will be made for foundations 
which will permit an additional floor when and if feasible. 

Marina Parking Facilit y 

Public support of adding decks to this facility was unanimous. The project 
is now before the Planning Commission for conformance with the Master Plan. 
When the Planning Commission indicates its approval, the Parking Authority 
will put the structure to bid. 

Marshall Square Parking Facility 

The Parking Authority has a new lessee, Allied Auto Parks, Inc., in this 
facility. The Parking Authority and the new lessee have jointly provided 
funds to repave, reblock, light and landscape this facility. 

George Mo scone Convention Center 

The Redevelopment Agency has asked the Parking Authority to develop a site 
on Third Street and Clementina for public parking. This facility will be 
the first of three facilities to serve the new developments and the Conven- 
tion Center. 



-7- 



Proposition N will appear on the November ballot to seek approval of the 
voters of San Francisco. 

The facility will be the second facility to be funded by Parking Authority 
bonds rather than through a non-profit corporation. 

The Mayor and the Board of Supervisors feel this financing will permit bonds 
to be retired early. If fiscal responsibility indicates, surplus funds when 
accrued,, could, at the discretion of the Board of Supervisors, be transferred 
to the general fund. 

Per f orming Arts Garage 

The Performing Arts Garage, which is the first facility to be funded by 
Parking Authority bonds, has been beset by legal actions. The Redevelopment 
Agency has been unable to transfer this property and litigation continues. 

Legal counsels for Redevelopment Agency and the Parking Authority indicate 
a compromise has been effected and that construction should ensue in early 
1980. 

School Properties^ 

The San Francisco Unified School District in conjunction with the Parking 
Authority is working toward using Yerba Buena and Laguna Honda School yards 
for public parking. This utilization would be on a temporary baole until 
there is a permanent use of these properties. 

The use of these properties will aid the parking problems of Irving Street 
and the Marina shopping area. 

Parking Rates 

Parking rates at the following facilities have been changed by the Parking 
Authority and approved by the Board of Supervisors, These changes have been 
made to implement City policy to encourage short-term, turnover parking and 
to discourage long-term, commuter parking: 

Golden Gateway Garage 
Japanese Cultural Center 
Marshall Square Parking Plaza 
Portsmouth Square Garage 
Seventh and Harrison Parking Plaza 
Vallejo Street Garage 

Van Pools 

The Parking Authority and the Board of Supervisors have approved the admit- 
tance of vanpools in all public parking facilities that have the height 
allowance to accommodate such vehicles. 



- 8 - 



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-11- 



PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 &&& issued) 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 a nd issued) $5,000,000.00 
Transferred to Account 232 , 684. 59 

Appropriated $5,232,684.59 

Expended $5,230,458.41 

Surplus * g 2,246.18 

Unappropriated balance June 30, 1979 $ 395,502.00 

^Account closed June 30, I960, surplus funds 
transferred to Unappropriated Account No. 1990 

All outstaading bonds have matured, have been presented for payment 
and will no longer constitute an obligation of the City. 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of Mayor Dianne Feinstein, the Chief Adminis- 
trative Officer, Members of the Board of Supervisors, the City Attorney, 
Controller, Director of Property, Director of Public Works, City Engineer, 
Traffic Engineer, Director of Planning, the private garage industry, the 
public-spirited citizens comprising the corporations sponsoring many major 
projects, and others who have given so generously of their time and contri- 
buted so greatly to the advancement of its program during the past year. 

A special acknowledgment must be made of the Parking Authority Chair, Donald 
Magnin. Mr. Magnin has served untiringly for eighteen years, thirteen years 
as Chair. He has given unstintingly of his time and has been the strong 
advocate of short-term, turnover parking at a minimal cost. 

The Parking Authority also thanks Member Richard Guggenhime, who served for 
only a short term. Mr. Guggenhime has been appointed to the Board of Permit 
Appeals . 

The Parking Authority welcomes Member Dr. Amancio Ergina, who was appointed 
by Mayor Dianne Feinstein to fill out the term of Member Guggenhime. Dr. 
Ergina comes to the Parking Authority after exemplary service on the Housing 
Authority, 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

ft 7 '■■•>u' / ~w.",^o 7 :>-n 

Margaret L. Brady V 

Director 

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ANNUAL REPORT 



1979-1980 




DOCUMENTS DEPT. 



di in* if* i icac / 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

AMANCIO G. ERGINA 

RUTH CHURCH GUPTA 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 



MARGARET L. BRADY, Director 



HONORABLE DIANNE FEINSTEIN, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 1 

PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 2 

FACILITIES CONSTRUCTED AND IN OPERATION 3 

OFF-STREET PARKING FUND APPROPRIATIONS 1979-80 4 

PROJECTS PROPOSED AND UNDER WAY 1980-81 4 

PROJECTS APPROVED AND IN OPERATION 5 

FUNDS GENERATED BY PARKING AUTHORITY TO 

GENERAL FUND AND OTHER DEPARTMENTS 6 

REPORT OF DIRECTOR MARGARET BRADY 7-9 

PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 9 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 10-12 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 13 

MAP OF PARKING FACILITIES 14 




Honorable Dianne Feinstein 

City and County of San Francisco 

200 City Hall 

San Francisco CA 94102 

Dear Mayor Feinstein: 

On behalf of the Members of the Parking Authority and its Staff, I 
submit herewith the report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for 
the fiscal year 1979-80. 

I shall limit my message to one phase of our year's activities which 
I feel was the Parking Authority's contribution to San Francisco's 
financial stability. 

The Parking Authority, with permission of Mayor Feinstein, contracted 
for a survey by Touche Ross of the non-profit corporations, with partic- 
ular emphasis on the outstanding bonds and possible early redemption. 
The Parking Authority and the Mayor felt there is a definite possibility 
of turning some of these facilities over to the City in order to provide 
needed revenue. 

The report disclosed surplus funds over and above needed reserves in 
four facilities: Fifth & Mission, Civic Center Plaza, Sutter-Stockton 
and Portsmouth Square. 

Requests were made of each of these Boards of Directors to either retire 
bonds or turn surplus funds over to the City. 

To date Fifth & Mission has turned over approximately $1.1 million. Out- 
standing bonds will be retired by 1986 and the corporation has agreed to 
continue to turn over surplus funds, if available, each fiscal year. 

Civic Center Plaza has agreed to pre-pay $1 million of outstanding bonds, 
this being their surplus funds over required reserves. This will result 
in an increase of approximately $135,000 per year in income to the Recrea- 
tion & Park Commission. Outstanding bonds will be retired in 1988. 

■To date the Parking Authority and the Mayor have met with complete 
resistance on the part of directors of Sutter-Stockton and Portsmouth 
Square Garages vis-a-vis our request that they, too, direct surplus 
funds to the General Fund of the City. 



-2- 



Sutter-Stockton could retire a 1959 bond issue. The corporation has 
over $3.5 million in surplus revenue. Year 2000 is the retirement 
date for the 1975 issue. 

Portsmouth Square has sufficient surplus to retire all of the outstand- 
ing bonds, over $1.3 million. These bonds will be retired in 1989. 

The Parking Authority, together with the Mayor's office, will continue 
negotiations on (1) early retirement of bonds so revenue will accrue 
to the City, or (2) transfer of surplus funds of the corporation to the 
City on an annual basis. We sincerely trust this can be worked out 
amicably in order to avoid costly litigation. 

Proposition S, which was successful in June 1980, provides that a 25% 
surcharge shall be levied on all non-profit garage corporations. This 
will increase revenue to the City and lessen the surpluses that have 
been accruing. 

The Parking Authority is again proud of the Grand Jury Report which is 
complimentary to our department and our director, Margaret Brady. The 
report emphasizes the necessity for maintaining the Parking Authority 
as a separate entity. 

We welcome the first female member to the Parking Authority, Ruth Church 
Gupta, attorney and representative of our District Merchants, who was 
appointed by Mayor Feinstein to the expired term of Dr. Michael McFadden. 

fully sub 

Donald Magnin 
Chairman 





STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1980 

************************* 

The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1979-80, together 
with supplemental information, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copy of the Authority's 
official annual report. 

PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

F/tue MzmbeAA appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors . 

Stci^i composed of three members, including the Director. 

PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Law of 1949 recognized that the provision of additional parking 
facilities and the performance of all undertakings incidental to providing 
such facilities are public uses and purposes for which public money may be 
spent and private property acquired and are governmental functions. 
(California Streets and Highways Code, Sec. 32501) . 

Pursuant to this legislative notice, the State Legislature permitted, 
subject to the determination by the local legislative body that there is 
need for an authority to function, a public body corporate and politic 
known as the Parking Authority of the City and County of San Francisco. 
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors recognized the need for such a 
parking authority, and the Administrative Code, Chapter 17, expressed 
this need and assigned jurisdiction and control over parking projects 
to the Parking Authority of the City and County of San Francisco. 

The State Code (Sec. 32656, Streets and Highways) mandated a five-member 
authority. Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, in October 1949, appointed, with con- 
firmation by the Board of Supervisors, the first Chairman and Members of 
the San Francisco Parking Authority. 



-2- 



The Parking Authority is authorized to issue revenue bonds, acquire 
property, sell property, construct public parking facilities and public 
rights of way convenient thereto, and to administer facilities to be used 
as off-street parking lots and garages. Such facilities may provide for 
the performance of services to the public incidental or advantageous to 
public parking projects and which are reasonably necessary to utilize such 
property as a public parking facility for the purpose of regulating, con- 
trolling and relieving the congestion of street traffic. 

The Authority is responsible for the proper performance of lessees or 
operators of public parking facilities and the promotion of the public 
interest. The administration, books and records of such operators are 
subject to Authority scrutiny. 

Finally, the Authority advises the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors on 
all matters pertaining to off-street parking and the parking and traffic 
control regulatory field. 

PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 

1979-80 - Salaries and Parking Authority 

Administration $84,070 

Provided to Other Departments: 

City Attorney 33,011 

Real Estate 15,027 

Light, Heat and Power (PUC) 4,160 

Controller 2,600 

DPW: Building Repair/Maintenance 7,208 
Street Cleaning Bureau 46,322 

Traffic Engineers 9,450 

Tax Collector: Possessory Interest Tax 

Golden Gateway 43,817 

Japan Center 12,282 



-3- 

FACILITIES CONSTRUCTED AND IN OPERATION 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 

Total 
Stall Construction Project 

Name Completed Capacity Land Cost Cost Cost 

♦Union Square September 11, 1,081 $ -0- $1,646,331 $1,646,311 
Garage 1942 

Marshall Square November 1, 111 -0- -0- -0- 
Parking Plaza 1948 

St. Mary's Square May 12, 1954 828 417,513 2,300,000 2,717,513 
Garage 

♦♦Ellis-O'Farrell August 5, 900 -0- -0- 2,800,000 
Garage 1957 

Fifth & Mission August 28, 

Garage 1958 938 1,690,970 2,966,697 4,657,667 

Expansion I November 21, 534 -0- 1,000,000 1,000,000 
1961 

Expansion II February 6, 316 258,100 1,188,700 1,446,800 
1970 

Civic Center March 1, 1960 840 -0- 4,298,822 4,298,822 
Plaza Garage 

Sutter-Stockton November 19, 870 2,665,069 3,837,177 6,502,246 
Garage 1960 

Expansion I July 1, 1976 555 1,000,000 5,166,847 6,166,847 

Portsmouth Square August 24, 

Garage 1962 504 -0- 3,181,500 3,181,500 

Golden Gateway December 21, 1,000 1,090,000 6,135,000 7,225,000 
Garage 1966 

Japanese Cultural February 16, 850 256,640 3,750,000 4,006,640 
Center Garages 1968 

*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired, and effect- 
ive August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Management and 
Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining assets to 
the City, the Union Square Garage filed a certificate of winding up and dissolu- 
tion with the Secretary of State. A new operating lease was executed between 
the City and private garage operator for a period of ten years and nine months 
commencing October 1, 1967. 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it was 
acquired by the City. 



-4- 



PARKING AUTHORITY 
OFF-STREET PARKING FUND APPROPRIATIONS 1979-80 



Date 
Approp. 
Placed 
on Books 

7/13/79 



9/28/79 

9/24/79 
4/18/80 
9/24/79 
5/19/80 
Uotat 



Purpose 

MARSHALL SQUARE PARKING PLAZA 
Repairs per lease agreement 

18 NEIGHBORHOOD PARKING LOTS 
Restripe 901 parking stalls 



Appropriated 

and Expended Work Status 



19,500 



7,208 



PERFORMING ARTS CENTER GARAGE 

Litigations Expense vs Pride Foundation 10,000 
Design Consultant (Tudor) (D) 20,000 



Completed 
Contract 

Completed 
DPW 



Completed 
Completed 



PARKING METER PROJECT 
Conversion Program, etc. 



$743,625 
160,496 



904,121 In progress 



I£em& mankad [V] dzfalmd cu> ^und& dlv&itzd ifwm OH-SVlzqJ: PaAking 
Vund to be tieAjmbu/uzd upon baJLo. oh bond*. 



PROJECTS PROPOSED AND UNDER WAY 1980-81 



MOSCONE CENTER GARAGE 

Preliminary plans, soil tests, etc. 

LEGAL FEES - BOND REDEMPTION for 

Portsmouth Plaza, Uptown (Sutter- Stock ton) , 
Downtown (5th & Mission) Corporations 

ST. MARY'S SQUARE GARAGE 

Air Rights Study for proposed hotel 
development 

MARINA PARKING 
Double Decking 

PERFORMING ARTS CENTER GARAGE 

To ensure progression of construction 

MISSION-BARTLETT PARKING PLAZA 
Double Decking 



$ 320,000 
25,000 

12,500 

43,800 
4,500,000 



Ordinance 464-80 
(On Mayor's Desk) 

File 101-80-20 
(Passed by Finance 
Committee) 

Already appropriated- 
Real Estate Dept. 
working 

File 101-80-11 
Project 506 

Pending 



120,000 Project 508 



-5- 

Projects approved and in operation : 21 

District 

Eureka Valley (Castro Street) 

Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 

West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 

West Portal (Claremont-Ulloa Streets) 

Geary (Geary Boulevard) 

Geary (18th-19th Avenues) 

Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 

Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 

Noe Valley (24th Street) 

Portola (Felton Street 

Mission (16 & Hoff Streets) 

Mission (24 & Capp Streets) 
**Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 

Clement (8th Avenue) 

Clement (9th Avenue) 
♦Lakeside (Junipero Serra & Ocean Avenue) 
♦Lakeside (19th & Ocean Avenues) 

North Beach (Vallejo Street) 

Marina (Pierce Street) 

Polk (Redding School) 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 



*T/uwa ioAAnd to Neighborhood OU-St/ieet 
Pa/iking Vtwghom Ma/ich, 1965 

**lhmA{ewied to Neighborhood O^-Strzet 
VaAking VKogham June., 1974 



Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 


$ 79,768 


'20 


143,838 


20 


135,490 


24 


192,650 


22 


101,133 


36 


164,486 


36 


208,391 


25 


111,018 


16 


53,947 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


20 


88,862 


227 


645,800 


33 


153,254 


28 


108,440 


22) 


42,025 


21) 




163 


874,645 


82 


855,622 


40 


257,351 


30 


131,217 


973 


$4,674,484 



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-7- 



Report of 
Director Margaret Brady 



METERS 



The Board of Supervisors, in order to discourage long-term parkers and to 
increase revenue to the City, raised all parking meter fees and fines. 
Meters rates in the downtown core have been raised to 50<= per hour and 20C 
per hour in neighborhood areas. 

The Parking Authority provided over $750,000 for new meter heads and approx- 
imately $160,000 for conversion. All meters will be changed by early 1981. 

NEIGHBORHOOD PARKING 

Clement Street 

Clement Street West Merchants have requested meter zones to ease their park- 
ing problems from 23rd Avenue to 26th Avenue. Although the Department of 
Electricity is overburdened with the meter changes, they have promised to 
expedite the metering in this area. 

Excelsior 

Neighborhood merchants have requested baying of Paris and London Streets. 
The Parking Authority can fund areas only where meters are installed. 
Residents have requested that neither of the above areas be metered as 
they feel there would be a reverse impact on residential parking. 

16TH & HOFF 

Request has been made by the Mission Housing Coalition for a double deck 
on this site for housing. The Parking Authority feels it can provide addi- 
tional parking for this revitalized area and accommodate the housing as 
well. Request has been made of the Board of Supervisors for permission 
to study feasibility. 

Afarina 

Double decking is ready to proceed, which will give 32 additional spaces. 
The Parking Authority feels early 1981 will be start-up date so as to not 
interfere with holiday shopping. 

Mission-Bartlett 

Double decking is ready to proceed (220 additional spaces) . Again the 
Parking Authority feels an early 1981 start-up in order not to interfere 
with holiday shopping. The Board of Supervisors has requested the Real 
Estate Department/City Attorney and Housing Corporation to meet and confer 
with regard to air rights over this site for cooperative housing. 



-8- 



OTHER AREAS are being surveyed for possible meter locations. Restrictions 
placed on off-street parking at public hearings, transit preferential 
streets and the Board of Supervisors make acquisition of properties for 
this purpose almost impossible. 

PARKING FACILITIES 

Chairman Magnin's letter covers the Parking Authority's position on non- 
profit corporations under our purview. 

Civic Center Garage 

Security and lighting of stairways have been improved. 

MARSHALL SQUARE PARKING PLAZA 

Improvements of surface, lighting, landscaping, as well as a new lessee, 
have resulted in doubling the income from this facility. 

Performing Arts Center Garage 

Legal problems have been cured at this site. The fact that the City's 
bond rating has been temporarily suspended means construction is again 
delayed. The Mayor's office has approved alternate construction funding 
and if the Board of Supervisors concurs, the Parking Authority will com- 
mence construction by early 1981, with a completion date of nine months 
to a year. Acquisition money from the 1947 Bond Fund for the land has 
approval of the Board of Supervisors and the Mayor. 

A special mention should be made here as to the opening of the Louise 
Davies Symphony Hall. Inasmuch as the Performing Arts Center Garage was 
not completed for this historic opening, Chairman Donald Magnin, was 
asked to head a Transportation and Parking Committee for the week's 
events. Mr. Magnin appointed a committee comprised of: Margaret Brady, 
Parking Authority; James Leonard, Muni; James Mulpeters, Grayline; Chief 
Cornelius Murphy, SFPD; Sol Onorato, private parking; Officer Daniel 
O'Shea, SFPD; Scott Schoaf, Traffic Engineering; Nelson Wong, Traffic 
Engineering, with Peter Nardoza of the Mayor's office as liaison. 

Four months of intensive study resulted in a smooth and orderly handling 
of passenger vehicles, buses, taxi-cabs and other transportation. Mr. 
Magnin requested a special resolution of commendation from the Parking 
Authority to Mr. Nelson Wong, who provided detailed maps of parking and 
traffic patterns to inform patrons of available parking and convenient 
access and exit to the area. 

M oscone Convention Center Garage 

Proposition N (permission to construct and finance through Parking Authority 
bonds) was passed at the November 1979 election. The Mayor and Board of 
Supervisors have approved the lease and given a go-ahead. Construction will 
begin early 1981 with completion date early 1982. 



-9- 

PARKING RATES AND TAXES 

All rates at City controlled facilities were raised to reflect the increase 
in meter rates. The policy of the Parking Authority as set by the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors, continues to discourage the long-term parker and elim- 
inate by attrition all monthly parkers. The first four-hour rates are to 
accommodate the short-term, turnover parker who shops or seeks professional 
services in the downtown area. 

PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 

Original Bond Fund (Authorized 1947 and issued) $5,000,000.00 

Transferred to Account 232,684.59 

Appropriated $5,232,684.59 

Expended $5,230,438.41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 

Unappropriated balance June 30, 1980 $ 436,424.00 

* Account closed June 30, 1960, surplus funds 
transferred to Unappropriated Account No. 1990 

All outstanding bonds have matured, have been presented for payment 
and will no longer constitute an obligation to the City. 



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-13- 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of Mayor Dianne Feinstein, the Chief Admin- 
istrative Officer, Members of the Board of Supervisors, the City Attorney, 
Controller, Director of Property, Director of Public Works, City Engineer, 
Traffic Engineer, Director of Planning, the private garage industry, the 
public spirited citizens comprising the corporations sponsoring many major 
projects, and others who have given so generously of their time and contri- 
buted so greatly to the advancement of its programs during the past year. 

A special acknowledgement must be made of the Parking Authority Chair, 
Donald Magnin and Members, Dr. Amancio G. Ergina, Francis H. Louie, Achille 
H. Muschi and Dr. Michael J. McFadden. Members Magnin, Louie and Muschi 
have served the City and the Parking Authority for many years to maintain 
adequate and inexpensive public parking for our neighborhood and downtown 
areas. Dr. Ergina has brought fresh and innovative ideas from his service 
on the Housing Authority. 

The Parking Authority also thanks Dr. Michael McFadden for his nine years 
of service; and welcomes Ruth Church Gupta, attorney and representative of 
San Francisco's District Merchants. We know Mrs. Gupta will lend much to 
Parking Authority deliberations from her wide knowledge and experience in 
San Francisco civic and community activities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Margaret L. Brady 
Director 

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ANNUAL REPORT 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

NOV 1 a 188) 

fcMH FRANCioCO 



1980-1981 




THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 
AMANCIO G. ERGINA 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

JOHN PATRICK SHORT 



MARGARET L. BRADY, Director 



HONORABLE DIANNE FEINSTEIN, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 1 

PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 2 

FACILITIES CONSTRUCTED AND IN OPERATION 3 

OFF-STREET PARKING FUND APPROPRIATIONS 1980/81 4 

PROJECTS APPROVED AND IN OPERATION 5 

FUNDS GENERATED BY PARKING AUTHORITY TO 

GENERAL FUND AND OTHER DEPARTMENTS 6 

REPORT OF DIRECTOR MARGARET BRADY 7-8 

PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 8 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 9-11 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 12 

MAP OF PARKING FACILITIES 13 




Honorable Dianne Feinstein 

City and County of San Francisco 

200 City Hall 

San Francisco CA 94102 

Dear Mayor Feinstein: 

On behalf of the Members of the Parking Authority and its staff, I 
submit herewith the report of the San Francisco Parking Authority 
for the fiscal year 1980/81. 

Because of the many problems that have beset the Parking Authority 
this year, legal, planning, a declining bond market, etc., I am 
going to let our report stand without further comment. I shall 
address my remarks to an implied but unstated policy that parking 
is not desirable. 

I agree that acres of parked cars are certainly unattractive and 
environmentally noxious. However, we must admit that the passenger 
vehicle is the most accepted manner of transportation and, as such, 
provision must be made for its storage. . .particularly on a short- 
time basis. 

A Harbridge House report (May 1980) titled "The Future of the Auto 
in City Transportation" indicates that public transit at the optimum 
will carry only 15% of the population. The costs of providing public 
transit on a 24-hour, seven day basis are prohibitive. The Federal 
Government has already indicated its inability to subsidize massive 
public transit costs and the fares cannot be sized to meet the operat- 
ing costs, let alone capital costs. 

Therefore, we are faced with the necessity of providing for the auto- 
mobile. 

While this necessity exists let us remember that it translates into 
dollars, jobs and taxes. San Francisco figures for 1980/81 are: 

Parking meters provide $5.5 million annually. 

The Parking Tax (15% in San Francisco) provides in 
excess of $8,000,000. 

Parking fines provide $20,875,9 39. 

City-owned parking facilities provide a gross income of 
$16 million. 



-2~ 

There is no way to compute the taxes paid by downtown and neighbor- 
hood shopping areas that can be directly laid to convenient parkina. 
These taxes are payroll., sales, business taxes, etc. We do know that 
where parking is not available the patron goes to suburban shopping 
malls resulting in revenue loss to San Francisco. 

While I am not advocating the use of properties that can be used for 
housing and/or other purposes, I believe the City, its government and 
its citizens should face up to the fact that parking, properly planned 
and located, is necessary and that it does and will pay its way toward 
protecting the financial health of San Francisco and, further, will 
provide funds for some of the amenities that its citizens enjoy. 

A report in the American Banker suggests that bankers see a new oppor- 
tunity for inner-city retailing. The article was headlined "URBAN 
REVITALIZATION MOVEMENT PROMISES BRIGHT FUTURE FOR INNER-CITY RETAILING.' 
The text comments that American shopping habits are being reshaped today 
by extraordinary economic and social pressures. While these forces are 
clouding prospects fur suburban malls, their favorable impact on urban 
retailing is unmistakably clear. 

Recent studies, including one by CENTER FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS (University 
of Kansas) indicate that the lack of parking was the key "dislike" to 
shopping in urban downtowns. The reality is that the private car main- 
tains a high dominance over all local and short-distance travel. 

Of all person trips, 83.9% are made by private vehicle. These trips 
average 8.9 miles. Of all trips made via other modes the total is 
13.4% and these trips average 2.3 miles. Buses and streetcars carry 
just 1.9% of the person trips over a 7.4 mile length. Rapid transit 
moves 0.3% and the trips average 7.5 miles. Total public transit 
accounts for 2.7% of all trips but the average length is 32.4 miles. 
With the basic pattern of heavy dependability on private motor vehicle 
usage, it is difficult to plan for any significant short-term change 
in travel modes to and from downtown. 



Repo rt of Parking Authority Activities 1980/81 

The results of our program to accelerate the retirement of bonds at 
facilities under non-profit corporations has not been as successful 
as desired. 

Fifth S Mission, after its initial payment of $1.1 million to the General 
Fund, has not followed through on continuing to contribute surpluses in 
the year 1980/81. Their reason has been that the 25% tax on non-profit 
corporations as provided in Proposition S (June 1980) resulted in the 
absence pf any surplus. 



-3- 

Civic Center Plaza has retired $1 million in bonds and, again, due 
to the effects of Proposition S, Recreation & Park received an in- 
crease less than anticipated. 

Although the funds to the General Fund come through different channels, 
Proposition S has contributed over $1.2 million to the General Fund 
from the taxes collected from the non-profit corporations. 

Negotiations have been completed with the Sutter-Stockton Garage and 
their directors have agreed to turn over $2 million of surplus funds 
for the 1982/83 budget. In turn, Mayor Feinstein has agreed this 
corporation may expend $175,000 to determine the feasibility of adding 
floors to the structure to accommodate 367 stalls. No agreement has 
yet been reached as regard further surpluses. 

The directors of Portsmouth Square bought outstanding bonds in the 
approximate amount of $1 million. Agreement has not been reached as 
regards continuing surpluses. 

After five years of legal and other delays, the Parking Authority is 
happy to report that the Performing Arts Garage is finally under 
construction. The unfavorable bond market portended further delay. 
However, with the cooperation of Mayor Feinstein and the Board of 
Supervisors, the Parking Authority was permitted to use $4.5 million 
of Off-Street Parking Funds for the construction contract. 

The Performing Arts Garage will be in operation by early September, 
1982. It is anticipated that net revenue from the facility will 
amount to a minimum of $500,000 annually, which the Parking Authority 
will turn over to the General Fund. 

A developer has presented plans for housing over this garage which, 
if it proceeds, would take a minimum of 58 of the 600 planned public 
parking stalls. This would result in a loss of approximately $100,000 
annually to the General Fund, as net income is based on the same operat- 
ing costs whether 600 or 542 spaces are^ publicly used. 

tfully subipi/ted, 

Donald Magnin 
Chairman 





STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1981 

************************* 

The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1980-81, together 
with supplemental information, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copy of the Authority's 
official annual report. 

PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

F-tve MembeAA appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Sta.^1 composed of three members, including the Director. 

PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Law of 1949 recognized that the provision of additional parking 
facilities and the performance of all undertakings incidental to providing 
such facilities are public uses and purposes for which public money may be 
spent and private property acquired and are governmental functions. 
(California Streets and Highways Code, Sec. 32501). 

Pursuant to this legislative notice, the State Legislature permitted, subject 
to the determination by the local legislative body that there is need for an 
authority to function, a public body corporate and politic known as the 
Parking Authority of the City and County of San Francisco. The San Francisco 
Board of Supervisors recognized the need for such a parking authority, and 
the Administrative Code, Chapter 17, expressed this need and assigned juris- 
diction and control over parking projects to the Parking Authority of the 
City and County of San Francisco. 

The State Code (Sec. 32656, Streets and Highways) mandated a five-member 
authority. Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, in October 1949, appointed, with con- 
firmation by the Board of Supervisors, the first Chairman and Members of 
the San Francisco Parking Authority. 



-2- 



The Parking Authority is authorized to issue revenue bonds, acquire 
property, sell property, construct public parking facilities and public 
rights of way convenient thereto, and to administer facilities to be used 
as off-street parking lots and garages. Such facilities may provide for 
the performance of services to the public incidental or advantageous to 
public parking projects and which are reasonably necessary to utilize such 
property as a public parking facility for the purpose of regulating, con- 
trolling and relieving the congestion of street traffic. 

The Authority is responsible for the proper performance of lessees or 
operators of public parking facilities and the promotion of the public 
interest. The administration, books and records of such operators are 
subject to Authority scrutiny. 

Finally, the Authority advises the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors on 
all matters pertaining to off-street parking and the parking and traffic 
control regulatory field. 

PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 

Salaries and Parking Authority Administration $81,919 

Provided to Other Departments: 

City Attorney 37,380 

Real Estate 15,670 

Light, Heat and Power (PUC) 3,575 

Controller 2,750 
Department of Public Works: 

Building Repair /Maintenance 15,000 

Street Cleaning Bureau 116,822 

Traffic Engineers 9,450 

Building Inspection (Public Garages) 2,200 
Tax Collectors Possessory Interest Tax 

Golden Gateway 43,900 

Japan Center 12,310 



-3- 



FACILITIES CONSTRUCTED AND IN OPERATION 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 

Total 
Construction Project 
Cost Cost 



Name 


Completed 


Stall 
Capacity 


Land Cost 


*Union Square 
Garage 


September 11, 
1942 


1,081 


$ -0- 


Marshall Square 
Parking Plaza 


November 1, 
1948 


111 


-0- 


St. Mary's Square 
Garage 


May 12, 1954 


828 


417,513 


**Ellis-0'Farrell 
Garage 


August 5, 


900 


-0- 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 


August 28, 
1958 


938 


1,690,970 


Expansion I 


November 21, 
1961 


534 


-0- 


Expansion II 


February 6, 
1970 


316 


258,100 


Civic Center 
Plaza Garage 


March 1, 1960 


840 


-0- 


Sutter-Stockton 
Garage 


November 19, 
1960 


870 


2,665,069 


Expansion I 


July 1, 1976 


555 


1,000,000 



$1,646,331 $1,646,331 

-0- -0- 

2,300,000 2,717,513 

-0- 2,800,000 

2,966,697 4,657,667 
1,000,000 1,000,000 
1,188,700 1,446,800 

4,298,822 4,298,822 

3,837,177 6,502,246 

5,166,847 6,166,847 

Portsmouth Square August 24, 504 -0- 3,181,500 3,181,500 
Garage 1962 

Golden Gateway December 21, 1,000 1,090,000 6,135,000 7,225,000 
Garage 1966 

Japanese Cultural February 16, 850 256,640 3,750,000 4,006,640 
Center Garages 1968 

*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired, and effect- 
ive August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Management and 
Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining assets to 
the City, the Union Square Garage filed a certificate of winding up and dissolu- 
tion with the Secretary of State. A new operating lease was executed between 
the City and private garage operator for a period of ten years and nine months 
commencing October 1, 1967. 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it was 
acquired by the City. 



-4- 



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-5- 



Projects approved and in operation ; 21 

District 

*Eureka Valley -Castro Street 

-Collingwood Street 

West Portal - West Portal Avenue 

- Claremont-Ulloa Streets 

Geary - Geary Boulevard 

- 18th-19th Avenues 

Inner Irving - 8th~9th Avenues 
Outer Irving - 20th Avenue 

Noe Valley - 24th Street 

Portola - Felton Street 

Mission - 16th & Hoff Streets 

- 24th & Capp Streets 
**Miss ion-Bar tie tt Parking Plaza 

Clement - 8th Avenue 

- 9th Avenue 

***Lakeside - Junipero Serra & Ocean Avenue 
- 19th & Ocean Avenues 

North Beach - Vallejo Street 

Marina - Pierce Street 

Polk - Redding School 

Excelsior - Norton-Harrington Streets 



Parking 
Stalls 


Cost 


20 
18 


$ 79,768 
143,838 


20 
24 


135,490 
192,650 


22 
36 


101,133 
164,486 


36 
25 


208,391 
111,018 


16 


53,947 


15 


42,451 


72 

20 

227 


284,096 

88,862 

645,800 


33 
28 


153,254 
108,440 


22) 
21) 


42,025 


163 


874,645 


82 


855,622 


40 


257,351 


30 


131,217 


970 


$4,674,484 



*In fiscal year 1980/81 metered stalls at Eureka Valley were reduced 
by three to create parking spaces for physically handicapped. 

**Transferred to Neighborhood Off-Street Parking Program June 1974 

***Transferred to Neighborhood Off-Street Parking Program March 1965 



-6- 



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-7- 



Report of 
Director Margaret Brady 

METERS AND OFF-STREET PARKING FUND 

The change of meter rates and installation of new heads in all 
districts is now complete. The increase in fees is projected to 
provide the Off-Street Parking Fund with $5.3 million annually. 

Supervisor Louise Renne and the Parking Authority cooperated in 
amending the Traffic Code to provide that at July 1, 1982 the 
first $3 million of the fund will go to the General Fund for 
traffic related items. This is a 100% increase from $1.5 million. 

The Parking Authority will use the balance, $2.3 million, for 
construction of the second deck for Mission-Bartlett and for 
addition to the Marina public parking lot. 

NEIGHBORHOOD PARKING 

Clement Street West 

New meters have been installed between 23rd Avenue and 26th Avenue. 

18th & Castro Lot 

Public hearings have been held by the Board of Supervisors (Streets 
and Transportation) with regard to the noise and disturbances at 
this site. Neighbors and merchants seem to have arrived at agree- 
ment. The Parking Authority will provide additional lighting. 

Geary Boulevard 

The Parking Authority has been asked to enter into a lease agreement 
for public parking on the two floors above Merrill's (Geary between 
16th and 17th Avenues) . This will provide some additional 148 public 
parking spaces for the Clement Street restaurants and the merchants 
on Geary proper. 

Geary Boulevard (East of 14th Avenue) 

Chair Donald Magnin and Director Margaret Brady met with the merchants 
regarding parking in the area adjoining Jordan Park. The Parking 
Authority has work-ordered Traffic Engineers to update their parking 
survey for this area to indicate need and possible remedy. 

Inner Sunset - Laguna Honda School 

The Board of Supervisors has given the Parking Authority permission 
to enter into a lease with the Board of Education for parking at the 
Laguna Honda School play yard area. This will provide 51 public 
parking stalls for this area. 



-8- 

Inner Sunset - 8th and 9th Avenues 

Request has been made of the Department of Public Works to reverse 
the entrance and exit at this lot. The advent of Muni Metro on 
9th Avenue has made entrance from that avenue difficult and cars 
have been congesting the area awaiting entrance. It is felt that 
entering on 8th Avenue and exiting on 9th Avenue will permit 
better service at this site. 

Afarina 

The Department of Public Works, Bureau of Engineers, has been given 
an appropriation to draw plans and specifications for this addition, 
Bids should be received and a start-up date of early 1982. 

Mission-Bartlett 

Because of General Fund needs, the Parking Authority was asked to 
declare $2,750,000 of Off-Street Parking Funds to implement the 
City's 1981/82 budget. This, together with the $1.5 million man- 
dated by the Traffic Code, left the Parking Authority with antici- 
pated revenue of $1,025,000 for this fiscal year. Consequently, 
construction of the second deck at this location (approximately 
$1.5 million) has been delayed until fiscal year 1982/83. 

PARKING RATES AND TAXES 

The policy of the Parking Authority as set by the Mayor and Board 
of Supervisors, continues to discourage the long-term parker and 
eliminate by attrition all monthly parkers. The first four-hour 
rates are to accommodate the short-term, turnover parker who shops 
or seeks professional services in the downtown area. 

PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 

Original Bond Fund $5,000,000.00 

(Authorized and issued 1947) 

Transferred to Account 232,684.59 

Appropriated $5,232,684.59 

Expended 5,230,438.41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 

Unappropriated balance June 30, 1981 $ 25,049.00 

* Account closed June 30, 1960, surplus funds 
transferred to Unappropriated Account No. 1990 




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-12- 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and acknow- 
ledge the cooperation and assistance of Mayor Dianne Feins tein, the 
Chief Administrative Officer, Members of the Board of Supervisors, the 
City Attorney, Controller, Director of Property, Director of Public 
Works, City Engineer, Traffic Engineer, Director of Planning, the 
private garage industry, the public spirited citizens comprising the 
corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who have given 
so generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the advance- 
ment of its programs during the past year. 

A special aknowledgement must be made of the Parking Authority Chair, 
Donald Magnin and Members Dr. Amancio G. Ergina, Francis H. Louie, 
Achille H. Muschi and John Patrick Short. 

Ruth Church Gupta, the Parking Authority's first female member resigned 
after serving for only three months. Mrs. Gupta was appointed to the 
Fair Political Practices Commission of the State of California. We 
congratulate Mrs. Gupta and know her talent and experience will be a 
great asset to this Commission and a loss to the Parking Authority. 

Mayor Feins tein appointed Mr. John Patrick Short of the Polk Street 
Merchants vice Mrs. Gupta. We welcome "Pat" and the Parking Authority 
has already benefited from his active interest and knowledge of the 
problems of the San Francisco small merchant. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Margaret L. Brady 
Director 



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